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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Health conditions

 

Recognizing and addressing malnutrition in our communities by Alexandra Lewin-Zwerdling, PhD, MPA, Judy Simon, MS, RD, LDN, and Mary Walsh, MEd-5803

Recognizing and addressing malnutrition in our communities by Alexandra Lewin-Zwerdling, PhD, MPA, Judy Simon, MS, RD, LDN, and Mary Walsh, MEd

Regular activity is fundamental to healthy aging. Yet so is our diet, and one that lacks key nutrients has an enormous effect on our ability to be active and remain independent. Many studies document the connection between diet and activity, underscoring that the two must work together for us to achieve a healthy lifestyle, especially as we age. Poor diets can increase bone loss, reduce cognitive function, delay recovery times and prolong periods of hospitalization; they can also accelerate loss of muscle mass. ... The state of being poorly nourished, commonly known as malnutrition, remains a prevalent public health problem particularly for older adults. Yet for many aging experts, it goes largely unnoticed.

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Health conditions

Promoting kidney health by LaVarne A. Burton-1491

Promoting kidney health by LaVarne A. Burton

As a professional working with older adults, you know the value of a healthy lifestyle in preventing or managing chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Are you as aware, however, of chronic kidney disease and the importance of lifestyle in maintaining kidney health?

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Health conditions

Active living with low vision by Pris Rogers, PhD and  Julia Brock, MA-1460

Active living with low vision by Pris Rogers, PhD and Julia Brock, MA

“Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” is a well-known phrase from the United States Declaration of Independence. Yet we often fail to consider the implications of the phrase when people need additional assistance or residential modifications to continue an enjoyable and satisfying lifestyle. Staying active and involved is important to everyone— including older adults with low vision who, like everyone else, need to maintain physical and mental health.

People who lose vision later in life often believe that their lives are essentially over and that they will never again have control. Vision loss affects every aspect of an older adult’s life and puts caregivers and family members at a loss as to how to help. Our purpose is to give you suggestions for making changes and adjustments that should help clients regain confidence and enhance their everyday living, leisure time and safety.

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Health conditions

Sarcopenia: what it is (and is not) and how to deal with it by Alexandra Williams, MA-1384

Sarcopenia: what it is (and is not) and how to deal with it by Alexandra Williams, MA

Although many adults may not know the definition of sarcopenia, they certainly know its effects, as this loss of muscle function and strength can lead to a significantly decreased quality of life or even death. Falls and fractures, impaired mobility, decreased ability to perform tasks of daily living, and a loss of independence are all associated with sarcopenic declines.

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Health conditions

Actions and exercises to improve posture  by Kathy M. Shipp, PT, MHS, PhD-1260

Actions and exercises to improve posture by Kathy M. Shipp, PT, MHS, PhD

It is true that gravity takes its toll as we age. The pull of gravity on our bodies over decades of living can result in body alignment that brings the head, shoulders and upper back forward. These changes occur gradually, so often people do not realize the changes have occurred and have become fixed; a person may suddenly realize that bringing the head up and back, pulling the shoulders back, and reducing the forward curve of the spine is not possible.

Fortunately, attention to good alignment throughout every day and targeted exercise can prevent poor posture with aging. Even those with long-standing poor alignment can improve to some extent.

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Health conditions

Diabetes prevention 101: small and simple changes prevent type 2 diabetes by Linda Haas, PhC, RN, CDE, and Sandra Burke, PhD, RN, ANP, CDE-1175

Diabetes prevention 101: small and simple changes prevent type 2 diabetes by Linda Haas, PhC, RN, CDE, and Sandra Burke, PhD, RN, ANP, CDE

Sam Kitching, a 67-year-old Florida native, weighed 260 lbs. eight years ago. He was at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, a disease that affects an estimated 285 million people worldwide, including almost 24 million people in the United States who live with this condition.

“A friend of mine, a retired doctor, had been telling me for years that I needed to lose some weight because I was setting myself up for health problems down the road,” Kitching says. “He told me, ‘Sam, I’ve got to be straight. Either you lose a little weight, or you are on your way to a heart attack or diabetes.’”

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Health conditions

Total items: 30

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