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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Nutrition

 

Recognizing and addressing malnutrition in our communities by Alexandra Lewin-Zwerdling, PhD, MPA, Judy Simon, MS, RD, LDN, and Mary Walsh, MEd-5805

Recognizing and addressing malnutrition in our communities by Alexandra Lewin-Zwerdling, PhD, MPA, Judy Simon, MS, RD, LDN, and Mary Walsh, MEd

Regular activity is fundamental to healthy aging. Yet so is our diet, and one that lacks key nutrients has an enormous effect on our ability to be active and remain independent. Many studies document the connection between diet and activity, underscoring that the two must work together for us to achieve a healthy lifestyle, especially as we age. Poor diets can increase bone loss, reduce cognitive function, delay recovery times and prolong periods of hospitalization; they can also accelerate loss of muscle mass. ... The state of being poorly nourished, commonly known as malnutrition, remains a prevalent public health problem particularly for older adults. Yet for many aging experts, it goes largely unnoticed.

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Nutrition

Why muscle mass matters by Ashley Bronston, MS, RDN, and Menghua Luo, MD, PhD-5700

Why muscle mass matters by Ashley Bronston, MS, RDN, and Menghua Luo, MD, PhD

We know that aging causes changes in body composition; a decrease in muscle and an increase in fat tissue. This loss of muscle mass and strength is referred to as sarcopenia, the Greek term meaning “poverty of the flesh.” This article offers a review (or refresher) on muscle, body composition and the older adult for active-aging professionals. The older adults with whom these professionals work cover the functional spectrum--from frail individuals who need ongoing assistance, to athletes who challenge themselves to improve their performance. While their fitness levels and functional abilities will differ, clients or residents can all take steps to enhance muscle health. The question is: Why does muscle matter?

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Nutrition

Agent of lifestyle change: Dr. Andrew Weil sows health for the whole person by Colin Milner-5341

Agent of lifestyle change: Dr. Andrew Weil sows health for the whole person by Colin Milner

No one can deny Dr. Andrew Weil’s bold views or his real impact when it comes to a more holistic approach to health at all ages. Known as the "father of integrative medicine," this renowned physician and author discusses eating for health, aging well, and transforming healthcare. He stresses the need for "a culture of health," as well as promoting health and preventing disease.

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Nutrition

More than nourishment: a wellness approach to dining services by Maureen Janowski, RD, LDN-1321

More than nourishment: a wellness approach to dining services by Maureen Janowski, RD, LDN

Food is at the heart of many cultures and it is certainly a focal point in most senior living communities. Twenty years ago, the word food would have conjured up two images in the retirement community environment: nourishment and socialization. Planning a healthy menu and ensuring a pleasant dining experience were the main priorities. In terms of diet, food was thought of as a reactive treatment—what foods to avoid or limit. In today’s world, we now know that food can be proactive. It is more than nourishment and socialization.

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Nutrition

A healthy foundation: understanding older adults' caloric needs and how to achieve them by Kathryn Porter, MS, RD-1296

A healthy foundation: understanding older adults' caloric needs and how to achieve them by Kathryn Porter, MS, RD

Determining what, when and why to eat certain foods to meet a target calorie level can be a challenging and daunting task at any age. This task is even greater in later life, however.

Older adults may be experiencing decline in muscle mass, less volume and intensity of physical activity, chronic health conditions, physical limitations, numerous medications, and slower metabolisms. Additionally, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2007–2008 reported that 78% of American men and 69% of American women ages 60 and older were overweight, while 37% and 34% respectively were obese; moreover, 60% of men and 74% of women had abdominal obesity.

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Nutrition

More table settings for healthy eating-1277

More table settings for healthy eating

When the MyPlate icon was released by the US Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services in June of 2011, it was a departure from the previous food pyramids. The goals were to remind people to make healthy food choices based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and to keep it simple.

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Nutrition

Total items: 19

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