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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Arthritis

 

Overcoming obstacles to exercise among people with arthritis: How can you help? by Julie J. Keysor, PT, PhD, and Aileen Ledingham, PT, MS-4794

Overcoming obstacles to exercise among people with arthritis: How can you help? by Julie J. Keysor, PT, PhD, and Aileen Ledingham, PT, MS

Joint pain and stiffness are cardinal signs of knee and hip osteoarthritis. Joint pain and stiffness make it difficult to move and people inevitably slow down. That doesn't really help, though. Inactivity makes muscles weak, which compounds the pain and stiffness. Inactivity in itself can result in pain and stiffness. How does one break the cycle? By knowing barriers to exercise and behavior-change strategies, you can guide older adults with this chronic condition in achieving more physically active lifestyles.

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Arthritis

Increasing physical activity among adults with arthritis by Mary B. Waterman, MPH, and Patience H. White, MD, MA-1532

Increasing physical activity among adults with arthritis by Mary B. Waterman, MPH, and Patience H. White, MD, MA

Arthritis is a serious disease that can be disabling, but a diagnosis of arthritis does not mean that an active life is out of reach. Physical activity is a safe and effective tool for managing the disease. However, few adults with arthritis engage in physical activity. Becoming and staying active is extremely important for these individuals, making the role of the active-aging professional key in helping individuals with arthritis live well.

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Arthritis

Hip osteoarthritis: aquatic exercise for healthy living on land by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP, and Cathy Maloney-Hills, RPT-1507

Hip osteoarthritis: aquatic exercise for healthy living on land by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP, and Cathy Maloney-Hills, RPT

Evelyne Janz lives in Lonay, Switzerland, and at age 54, she’s an avid swimmer, mountain biker, hiker and skier. For many years she has trained daily and worked as a professional water-fitness trainer, and swimming coach. In April 2012, Evelyne and her family skied the Chamonix-Zermat Haute Route (High Route) in the Swiss Alps, traversing glaciers for 6 days. But her family history of hip arthritis had taken its toll, and her physically active lifestyle had become progressively difficult due to hip pain and stiffness. To reclaim her lifestyle, Evelyne decided to undergo hip replacement surgery, an effective and now common1 treatment for disabling osteoarthritis.

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Arthritis

Promote exercise to people with arthritis-1275

Promote exercise to people with arthritis

When joints are stiff and in pain, physical activity seems like that last thing a person wants to do. On top of the discomfort, concerned friends and relations may urge a person with arthritis to “sit and rest.” Sedentary living, common in older adults, is certainly common in older adults with arthritis (1, 2).

There are many forms of arthritis, a chronic condition that affects the musculoskeletal system and joints (and sometimes the organs). Osteoarthritis is the most common form among all ages and particularly among older adults (3, 4). Osteoarthritis occurs because the cartilage that cushions the two bones meeting in a joint breaks down. Over time, the cartilage wears down and the bones begin to rub together. The result is changes to the joint, including swelling, bony protuberances and weakness in the joints and tendons (5, 6).

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Arthritis

Fit and Strong! an evidence-based program for older adults with osteoarthritis by Susan Hughes, DSW, Pankaja Desai, PhD, Rachel Seymour, PhD, and Gail Huber, PhD-1204

Fit and Strong! an evidence-based program for older adults with osteoarthritis by Susan Hughes, DSW, Pankaja Desai, PhD, Rachel Seymour, PhD, and Gail Huber, PhD

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common condition affecting older people today. It is also the leading cause of disability among them. OA is associated with aging and affects the joints of the body, which become stiff and painful on motion as the cartilage between bone surfaces wears down. Although OA can affect all joints in the body, its presence in lower extremity joints is particularly problematic.

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Arthritis

Arthritis: innovative, evidence-based programs get results by Marilynn Larkin, MA-550

Arthritis: innovative, evidence-based programs get results by Marilynn Larkin, MA

If you’re working in an active adult community, continuing care retirement community (CCRC), health club or other facility geared to older adults, chances are most of your members have arthritis. And the numbers will only increase, according to a 2007 report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The number of arthritis patients in the United States will rise from about 46 million people today to 67 million in 2030, the CDC predicts. Of those nearly 70 million people, 25 million (37%) will limit usual activities due to arthritis. In Canada, the number of people with arthritis is expected to increase from four million today to more than six million by 2026.2 Similar increases—and limitations in function—will likely be seen in many developed countries around the world.

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Arthritis

Total items: 9

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