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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Customer service

 

Five Meal Plan: Quincy Village reimagines food services-6002

Five Meal Plan: Quincy Village reimagines food services

Quincy Village in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, focuses "on providing older adults with quality service and a meaningful experience." Set amid the mountains, forests and farmlands of Franklin County, the not-for-profit continuing care retirement community provides four levels of living--independent living, personal care, assisted living and skilled nursing--and serves approximately 450 residents ages 55 and older. ... "Quincy Village is always looking at how we can raise the bar and deliver and support the best engaging services and culture, and in doing so, enhance the quality of life for our residents," says Director of Community Life and Volunteer Services Laura Glass. "For example, we determined a need to enhance the dining experience within our community." Quincy Village staff researched and designed a new meal program that they believed would work best for residents in nursing care. "This plan breaks away from the traditional tray service found in nursing homes and replaces it with fresh, made-to-order food five times a day (instead of three)," Glass says. Called the Five Meal Plan, the new dining program "has truly allowed us to provide quality resident-centered care," she adds.

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Customer service

A culture of hospitality: providing exceptional services, positive experiences-1504

A culture of hospitality: providing exceptional services, positive experiences

With more than 27 years’ experience working with senior living organizations and older adults, M. Sloan Bentley has seen a lot of changes in the industry. “For years senior living communities were thought of as a place where older adults went to be ‘cared for,’ but by today’s standards, that is so far from the truth,” states Bentley, a gerontologist and licensed nursing home administrator. “In fact, many communities are likened to a five-star hotel experience or living on a cruise ship.”

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Customer service

Fitness certifications: what they mean for your organization and your clientele by Todd Galati, MA, and Jessica Matthews, MS-1234

Fitness certifications: what they mean for your organization and your clientele by Todd Galati, MA, and Jessica Matthews, MS

Quality fitness programs can help clients achieve desired results in health and fitness—but not every program is appropriate for every client. To provide safe, effective programming for their clientele, organizations committed to active aging need individuals who possess the requisite education, credentials and experience.

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Customer service

Great expectations: the making of an age-friendly wellness center by Colin Milner-1221

Great expectations: the making of an age-friendly wellness center by Colin Milner

Five to 10 years ago, if you wished to serve the age 50-plus market, your main frame of reference was what was happening in the fitness club industry. Today’s frame of reference is much broader, with excellent best practice models in seniors housing, active adult communities, seniors centers, hospital fitness centers, YMCAs and JCCs, to name a few.

We have learned a lot about promoting active aging in these past 10 years. One thing we have discovered is that we spend too much money on trying to educate the older population about being fit and healthy. Among age 50-plus adults surveyed by AARP, 98% of respondents knew that getting enough exercise was important, and 64% agreed that physical activity was the best thing they could do for their health. This level of awareness means that marketers do not have to establish need with this market, but rather show how they provide a solution that will help potential clients overcome the barriers to entry.

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Customer service

Reinforce your customer's buying decision by Debra J. Schmidt-1180

Reinforce your customer's buying decision by Debra J. Schmidt

If I asked you right now whether or not you are in sales, chances are you might say, “No, I’m in accounts payable” or “I’m in customer service,” or “I’m in the marketing department.” You may even say, “I’m the CEO.”

Anytime you interact with a customer, you are selling your professional credibility and the company image. No matter what your job title is, you are in sales. I cringe when employees tell me, “I don’t need customer service training,” or “My job has nothing to do with sales.” Regardless of job descriptions, every employee in every department can impact the relationship that the company has with its customers and prospects.

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Customer service

Are you listening to your customers? by Debra J. Schmidt-1006

Are you listening to your customers? by Debra J. Schmidt

Instead of defining the meaning of quality service in your organization, let your customers define it for you. When you actively listen to your customers, they will tell you what they want, need and dislike. One thing that I guarantee customers do not like is being called by the wrong name.

Because listening does require extra effort, many people just pretend they are listening. Your customers can tell if you are pretending. They will be annoyed or even offended by your lack of attention. Worse, when you don’t listen to your customers, you miss out on tremendous opportunities.

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Customer service

Total items: 12

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