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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Functional training

 

Floor freedom: How to get up from the floor by Cathy Moxley, MA-1459

Floor freedom: How to get up from the floor by Cathy Moxley, MA

•The ability to get down and back up off the floor to do things like play with a child, clean out a kitchen cabinet or participate in a floor exercise class is something that younger adults may take for granted. Unfortunately, for many older adults, such daily activities and motions may gradually become more difficult until they eventually fall off the daily repertoire of possible movements.

An action that often enters into the category of “not any more” is getting down on the floor for any reason—on purpose, that is. Physical decline in the form of decreased upper-body and lower-body strength, a history of injuries or surgeries, decreased range of motion in many joints and balance issues can make the prospect of getting down—and back up—off the floor nothing short of daunting.

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Functional training

Functional screening: no two zebras look alike! by Elizabeth Leeds, DPT-1450

Functional screening: no two zebras look alike! by Elizabeth Leeds, DPT

A colleague once told me, “When you hear horses coming, think zebras!” This phrase is an excellent way to remember to question our assumptions before planning an exercise program. As therapists or personal trainers, we may see a client who is older and assume the person is unfit, only to find out that she or he is an avid exerciser who could be categorized as "athlete." That’s a perfect example of why it pays to hold off from making instant assumptions about a person’s capabilities.

With each client that you see, an initial consultation is needed to understand the client’s goals, lifestyle and abilities. There are multiple subjective, anatomical, postural and cardiovascular assessments available to therapists and trainers. These are valuable tools for determining the exercises and intensity levels appropriate for each individual. In addition, finding out more about a person’s lifestyle habits and activities can be just as important.

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Functional training

Merge function with fun using Life Skills Relays by Kim Eichinger-1439

Merge function with fun using Life Skills Relays by Kim Eichinger

For older adults moving into a retirement community, many of the physical tasks they used to perform are no longer a part of their daily routines. If these individuals do not wish to participate in other forms of exercise, they may become sedentary and at greater risk for compromised mobility.

When challenged by the fact that some older adults do not come from a culture where recreational exercise (or going to a gym) is a part of their lifestyles, staff in the fitness department at Country Meadows retirement communities realized we had to find a less traditional way to engage them in movement.

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Functional training

Exercise following stroke: Start survivors on the road to recovery  by Marianne Shaughnessy, PhD, CRNP-1116

Exercise following stroke: Start survivors on the road to recovery by Marianne Shaughnessy, PhD, CRNP

Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of disability. Each year, more than 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke; approximately one every 40 seconds. Stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability for the 6.4 million survivors in the US today (1). After age 55, the chance of having a stroke approximately doubles for each decade of life (18).

Rehabilitation and wellness professionals are in the best position to help these stroke survivors attain and maintain optimal levels of health and function. Each type of professional has a role to play.

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Functional training

Exploring the

Exploring the "so what" of function by Pamela E. Toto, MS, OTR/L

When you hear the word “function,” what image comes to mind?

Is it a runner on a treadmill or a bodybuilder lifting weights? Is it an image of increased range of motion in the shoulder joint or independence for a sit-to-stand transfer? Is it the ability of a person to climb out of the bathtub, plant a garden or change the curtains in the living room?

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Functional training

Improve function before knee replacement surgery  by Robert Topp, RN, PhD and  Phil Page, MS, PT;  Ann M. Swank, PhD; Peter M. Quesada, PhD; John Nyland, EdD, PT and Arthur Malkani, MD-1080

Improve function before knee replacement surgery by Robert Topp, RN, PhD and Phil Page, MS, PT; Ann M. Swank, PhD; Peter M. Quesada, PhD; John Nyland, EdD, PT and Arthur Malkani, MD

Osteoarthritis is a common chronic health condition. Among the estimated 27 million adults in the United States who had osteoarthritis in 2005, 33.6% were ages 65 and older (Lawrence, Felson, et al., 2008). One in 10 Canadians has osteoarthritis, and approximately 85% are ages 70 or older (Public Health Agency Canada).

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Functional training

Total items: 21

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