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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Spiritual wellness

 

Engaging loneliness in older adults by Donald R. Koepke, MDiv, BCC-437

Engaging loneliness in older adults by Donald R. Koepke, MDiv, BCC

Loneliness. We all experience it; we all witness it. It’s an emotional state that results from isolation—a belief that no one understands or cares. Loneliness differs from aloneness, however. To be alone just means no one else is around at the moment. To be alone with one’s thoughts, feelings and beliefs can cleanse and strengthen individuals. But to be lonely is to want people and social contact, and feel unable, in one’s estimation, to get this contact.

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Spiritual wellness

Engaging the inner voice by Donald R. Koepke, MDiv, BCC-409

Engaging the inner voice by Donald R. Koepke, MDiv, BCC

What is the inner voice? Some people experience it as conscience. Freudians might explain it as the Super Ego. For many, the inner voice sounds like one’s mother whispering in the ear. Individuals may refer to the inner voice as their feelings, random thoughts or memories, while still others experience it as a connection with the real self or even a Higher Being. Although everyone might interpret the purpose and source of this inner voice differently, all still encounter the voice within that guides, for good or ill, behaviors, beliefs and emotions.

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Spiritual wellness

Valuing the spirit in clients with dementia by Donald R. Koeple, Mdiv-365

Valuing the spirit in clients with dementia by Donald R. Koeple, Mdiv

When contemplating how fitness and wellness professionals might encourage mental and cognitive health in older adults, it is important to explore the effects of dementia on these efforts. For, on its surface, dementia seems to remove the very characteristics of the person being encouraged and developed.

Instead of being able to judge what is best for the self, people with dementia lose the capacity to consider consequences of actions, because they often have little regard for the past or future. Many of these individuals have difficulty remembering the way to the bathroom, much less remembering more complex tasks. They truly live in the moment.

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Spiritual wellness

Aging with spirit: perspectives on suffering by Donald R. Koepke-248

Aging with spirit: perspectives on suffering by Donald R. Koepke

Why do some people age gracefully, while others do not? Why do individuals differ so greatly when it comes to their ability to roll with the punches? How is it possible for one client to be content and engaging despite significant physical challenges, while another in relatively good health is constantly grumpy and discouraged? One essential reason is the way each person deals with the reality of suffering in life.

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Spiritual wellness

Head and heart: two ways of knowing by Donald R. Koepke-189

Head and heart: two ways of knowing by Donald R. Koepke

There are two ways of knowing in this world: with the head and with the heart. Some people believe only in what can be experienced through the senses or proved by reason. This empirical knowing, or knowing of the head, allows for analyzing, explaining and researching. Knowing of the head gives medical professionals insight into dementia, stroke and depression. This kind of knowledge is vital to human life. But it is not the only way of knowing.

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Spiritual wellness

Tapping the spirit by Donald R. Koepke-158

Tapping the spirit by Donald R. Koepke

At one time, the disciplines of physical health and spirituality seemed worlds apart. Physical health focused on the body, while spirituality emphasized the soul. The physical was the world of physicians and physical therapists, x-rays and stethoscopes - a world that could be seen, charted and analyzed. Spirituality, on the other hand, was seen to be intangible. Like a puff of wind, spirituality was both experienced and unknowable at the same time. The physical was controllable: the doorways to health were exercise and nutrition. But the spiritual talked about "things that are beyond knowing," which sounded to many like wishful thinking.

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Spiritual wellness

Total items: 13

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