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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Sports and athletics

 

Muscular conditioning for active-aging athletes by Wayne L. Westcott, PhD, CSCS-592

Muscular conditioning for active-aging athletes by Wayne L. Westcott, PhD, CSCS

Do you remember when you were in elementary school, sitting for hours in the classroom and then running outside for recess? You didn’t warm up; you just ran as fast as you could playing tag and other stop-and-go games. If you’re reading this article, however, those days are long gone. And a warm-up period may be the most important aspect of your activity sessions today.

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Sports and athletics

To run or not to run after age 50?by Raena Dumas, BA-581

To run or not to run after age 50?by Raena Dumas, BA

Have you ever crossed a finish line dripping with sweat, legs wobbling with fatigue, yet glowing with pride at what you have accomplished? Have you ever felt the euphoria of endorphins flooding your body after a race or run? If so, you’ve probably experienced the “runner’s high.” Millions of North Americans got their first taste of the runner’s high in the 1970s and realized running was a sport they could enjoy. Today, Boomers who started running in their youth are entering their 50s and 60s, and many are still part of the running wave—20% of the 2007 Boston Marathon finishers were age 50-plus, for example, and this figure rose to 55% with runners ages 40–49 included.

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Sports and athletics

Strengthening active older adults for better tennis, fitness and health by Wayne L. Westcott, PhD, CSCS-570

Strengthening active older adults for better tennis, fitness and health by Wayne L. Westcott, PhD, CSCS

Active older adults typically perform a variety of physical activities, but few of these provide progressive resistance exercise. For example, walking, running, cycling, swimming and other aerobic activities promote cardiovascular fitness, but they do not prevent the five-to-seven-pound-per-decade muscle loss associated with the aging process.

To maintain (and regain) muscle tissue, older adults must regularly perform sensible strength training. A recent study with 1,644 adults (mean age 53 years) showed an average muscle gain of 3.1 lbs. after 10 weeks of two or three weekly weight workouts. The same study revealed similar rates of muscle development for older, middle-aged and younger adults.

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Sports and athletics

Fitness Caching: high tech hits the trails by Leigh Crews-233

Fitness Caching: high tech hits the trails by Leigh Crews

An activity for all ages
Fitness Caching is an outdoor adventure workout, kicked up a notch by 21st century technology. This activity can be part hike, bike or run and part treasure hunt. It can also take people to undiscovered places, where they can enjoy the natural scenery, take a break for yoga, meditate, or scratch a few lines in a journal.

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Sports and athletics

The competitive spirit by Gwen Hyatt-67

The competitive spirit by Gwen Hyatt

Many new opportunities exist for adults aged 50 and above to put on their training shoes and enter the athletic arenas traditionally dominated by younger age groups. The Senior Olympics, Masters-level competition, AARP TriUmph! Classic swim/bike/run event and a plethora of charity-sponsored activities draw an increasing number of older athletes.

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Sports and athletics

Total items: 11

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