0
What's new: ICAA infographics series now available.

Articles

Search by topic

The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Career development

 

Blogs, social media and the Web: how to help your clients engage online by Marilynn Larkin, MA-1284

Blogs, social media and the Web: how to help your clients engage online by Marilynn Larkin, MA

Recent research confirms what many members of the International Council on Active Aging® (ICAA) are seeing in their organizations and communities—namely, dramatic increases in the use of social networking and online networking tools. According to the nonprofit Pew Research Center in Washington, DC, social networking use among American Internet users ages 50 and older nearly doubled—from 22% to 42%—between April 2009 and May 2010. At that point, half (47%) of users ages 50–64 and one in four (26%) users ages 65 and older used social networking sites.

more

Career development

Research literacy: how to know when claims and headlines miss the mark by Marilynn Larkin, MA-1181

Research literacy: how to know when claims and headlines miss the mark by Marilynn Larkin, MA

If you believe recent headlines, you may be convinced that little can be done to stave off cognitive decline or boost cognitive health. A study run in conjunction with a BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) TV program, and reported in the journal Nature, concluded that computer-based brain training does not improve mental fitness in any significant way. And the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently released a consensus statement indicating there is insufficient scientific evidence to recommend any specific strategies for preventing Alzheimer’s disease.

more

Career development

The journey toward personal training older adults by Terry Ferebee Eckmann, PhD-559

The journey toward personal training older adults by Terry Ferebee Eckmann, PhD

The rapid growth of the older adult population has increased the need for personal trainers qualified to design exercise programs for these clients. Aging Baby Boomers have shown a strong desire to look good, stay healthy, and have a high level of physical fitness. And more elders from earlier generations, who are living longer lives, are aware of the impact of physical activity on health, independence, and the ability to function in daily life. As a result, today’s age 50-plus adults often hire personal trainers because they want to learn how to perform exercises correctly. They want to make a wise investment of time and money to get the most out of their exercise experience.

more

Career development

Training an active older adult: a personal experience  by Rebecca J. Lloyd, Ph.D. candidate-161

Training an active older adult: a personal experience by Rebecca J. Lloyd, Ph.D. candidate

I have the pleasure of training Ben, an 80 year-old client, every Tuesday at 9 a.m.

Six years ago Ben experienced a silent ischemia, which has limited his cardiovascular capacity and the use of his right arm. Physical activity has been a way of life for Ben, so he decided to hire a personal trainer to help him monitor and guide his healthful progression.

more

Career development

Training senior fitness instructors: an update on proposed curriculum standards by C. Jessie Jones, Ph.D., FACSM-149

Training senior fitness instructors: an update on proposed curriculum standards by C. Jessie Jones, Ph.D., FACSM

Fitness and physical activity classes for older adults are springing up throughout the world in all kinds of facilities. The increase in senior fitness offerings results from a combination of two things:

* The recognized value of physical activity in preserving functional capacity and reducing physical frailty in later years (U.S. Surgeon General, 1996; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2000, 2001; World Health Organization, 2000); and
* The support of the medical community (Nied & Franklin, 2002).

more

Career development

Total items: 11

icaa 100 members