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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Management

 

Unravel the mysteries of intellectual property by Patricia Ryan, MS-5679

Unravel the mysteries of intellectual property by Patricia Ryan, MS

The budget is tight, and time is running out. You scheduled a series of educational programs and need material for teaching and handouts for the participants. You open the Internet browser to start searching for information, and reach for the notebook of handouts from seminars you’ve attended. These give you instant access to materials you need, and they are free, right? Maybe, maybe not. As a responsible business person, you will find it’s in your best interests to respect the intellectual property (IP) of others. So how do you responsibly and respectfully navigate IP?

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Management

utilizing spaces for wellness: Research highlights the challenges and opportunities-5669

utilizing spaces for wellness: Research highlights the challenges and opportunities

The trends have been constant over the past few years. Organizations are expanding their wellness programs by adding more classes and activities. New equipment and supplies are arriving. Employees, guests and others are using the facilities. Additional staff members are appearing. Yet, senior managers, along with directors and staff members, have commented in International Council on Active Aging® (ICAA) surveys that “space” and “lack of space” are ongoing challenges. Is there a contradiction here?

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Management

The future of technology for active aging-5663

The future of technology for active aging

Technology is developed to solve a problem, enhance productivity, deliver a service or entertain. There are a multitude of options, advanced by the widespread availability of computers, the Internet and cellular networks. Medical technology is used to provide more efficient care; assistive technology helps people function independently in everyday life; productivity technology, like software for accounting and word processing, is a given in many businesses; and healthy living technologies, such as pedometers or the apps that track dietary goals, are widely used. It is clear that there are many technologies to choose from, but it is less certain how technology will impact quality of life for older adults, and how it will benefit the services of organizations that provide wellness opportunities, health care and housing. Does technology solve problems or enhance productivity? Will it make life better—or more confusing?

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Management

Strategic approaches to choosing health and wellness information by Patricia Ryan, MS-5642

Strategic approaches to choosing health and wellness information by Patricia Ryan, MS

The aging population is suddenly a very popular topic, generating an amazing amount of information. Lifestyle, healthcare, housing, pensions, retirement, risks--the topics are so diverse and there is so much in each one that it boggles the mind. Then, there is the information you and your organization collect. If you feel buried by information overload, you are not alone. You can stay current and skip through information overload by keeping the word need at the top of your professional vocabulary, and by using the journalist’s watchwords: who, what, where, when and why.

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Management

Leading with lifestyle for marketing and sales success by Kimberly Hulett, BA, and Erin Read, BA-5639

Leading with lifestyle for marketing and sales success by Kimberly Hulett, BA, and Erin Read, BA

"The Boomers are coming! The Boomers are coming!" For a decade, this has been a common theme of conference presentations, media headlines and board meetings. Many of those offering housing and services to actively aging adults have felt stumped by this "new" consumer--the 50- or 60-something Baby Boomer. The reality is that with the rising age of entry for residents in continuing care retirement communities and other senior living settings, the "new" consumer is just as likely to be a 70-something member of the Silent Generation. There is one marketing technique that works with active adults of both cohorts. Lifestyle.

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Management

Making the connection between wellness and quality of life by Patricia Ryan, MS-5517

Making the connection between wellness and quality of life by Patricia Ryan, MS

When asked about what’s important as they age, older adults often place “health” and “being independent” at the top of the list, whether the question is asked by financial companies, AARP or university researchers. According to the International Council on Active Aging’s industry research, the health and well-being of residents is the top reason why age-qualified communities invest in lifestyle/wellness programs. So it’s fair to ask: How successful are communities in supporting their residents’ health, independence and overall quality of life?

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Management

Total items: 55

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