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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Program management

 

Three approaches to gathering input-1267

Three approaches to gathering input

Wellness staff members are often advised to involve clients in planning and delivering programs. Research has shown that when older adults feel they have a level of control over their surroundings and activities, they are more satisfied with life (Bekhet & Zauszniewski, 2011; Netuveli & Blane, 2008).

At the same time, staff members’ jobs are to plan and deliver programs. How does input from older adults mix with the work of the professionals?

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Program management

Fitness certifications: what they mean for your organization and your clientele by Todd Galati, MA, and Jessica Matthews, MS-1235

Fitness certifications: what they mean for your organization and your clientele by Todd Galati, MA, and Jessica Matthews, MS

Quality fitness programs can help clients achieve desired results in health and fitness—but not every program is appropriate for every client. To provide safe, effective programming for their clientele, organizations committed to active aging need individuals who possess the requisite education, credentials and experience.

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Program management

Measure what matters: using benchmarks as a tool for program evaluation by Patricia Ryan, MS-1155

Measure what matters: using benchmarks as a tool for program evaluation by Patricia Ryan, MS

There are a lot of choices when designing a wellness program for older adults. What is the mix of wellness dimensions, and how can they be integrated? Should you add more classes and activities, or reduce the number? What is the appropriate level of staffing? Within the budget, where is the money spent?

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Program management

Programming through the dimensions of wellness  by Susan Richie-1092

Programming through the dimensions of wellness by Susan Richie

Many communities and organizations are enhancing their current fitness and wellness programs by emphasizing the dimensions of wellness. Why incorporate the dimensions into your program? Making the dimensions of wellness the foundation of programming allows you to market your programs and services to everyone.

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Program management

The wellness audit: a useful tool for active-aging communities by John Rude, MS-1001

The wellness audit: a useful tool for active-aging communities by John Rude, MS

Are any of the following scenarios true for you?

• You hear a lot of discussion at conferences about the importance of a wellness program, but you’re not certain you have the right mix of resources or the financial ability to start a program.
• You have a wellness program. You believe it’s a good beginning, but you’re not confident how to ramp it up or what the benchmarks should be to measure success.
• You’ve been using multipurpose spaces for your wellness programming for several years. However, you now want to develop a state-of-the-art facility, but sense the architect you have used for your housing projects may not have the expertise to design an age-appropriate wellness center.

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Program management

Cultivating a water exercise program using an evaluation approach  Part three: probing the depths of water exercise equipment  by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM-963

Cultivating a water exercise program using an evaluation approach Part three: probing the depths of water exercise equipment by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM

During parts one and two of “Cultivating a water exercise program using an evaluation approach,” we applied an evaluation framework to develop an evidence-based, participant-centered water fitness program. In this third and final section, we’ll use the same framework to cultivate equipment-based programs that offer expanded options for personalized and progressive training.

A systematic evaluation approach provides a lens for program change. At each step in parts one and two, questions helped us focus on critical areas. Starting with the big picture, we grounded our systematic approach by determining core values that would provide a foundation for the evaluation, mapped out resources, and anticipated short- and long-term outcomes.

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Program management

Total items: 25

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