0
What's new: The business case for wellness programs in senior living.

Articles

Search by topic

The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Gerontology

 

Resilience: a requirement for successful aging in all settings  by Marilynn Larkin, MA-4268

Resilience: a requirement for successful aging in all settings by Marilynn Larkin, MA

Imagine it’s your 95th birthday. You’ve been in a hospital for a month, battling a respiratory infection, but defying all odds, you are actually doing better.1 The strength that drove you to endure 27 years in prison, to finally attain freedom and to become an icon for your nation clearly is still present. Nelson Mandela is arguably one of the world’s best examples of resilience—the ability to bounce back after a challenge. It’s a quality most of us have to some degree, and experts agree it can be bolstered and reinforced in the right environments.

more

Gerontology

Boost lifestyle activity to support clients in aging well by John C. Griffin, MSc-3644

Boost lifestyle activity to support clients in aging well by John C. Griffin, MSc

The demographics of our aging society dictate that quality of life will continue to be an important health promotion objective for all concerned with older-adult health and its broader societal impact. The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified a number of components of people’s perceptions of their quality of life, including health, physical function, social relations, occupation, standard of living, and sexual functioning. When used with a large number of Brazilian adults ages 60 and over, the WHO Quality of Life Instrument–Older Adults Module indicated that increases in levels of physical activity can contribute to improvements in quality of life.

more

Gerontology

Living well at 100: insights into the lives of today's centenarians-1509

Living well at 100: insights into the lives of today's centenarians

A new survey in the United States paints a cultural portrait of 100 people turning 100 years or older in 2012, with results that upend ageist stereotypes of the oldest-old. UnitedHealthcare’s seventh annual 100@100 Survey provides anecdotal insight into the lives and lifestyles of centenarians, and shows that these respondents are nearly as active—physically and socially—as adults half their age.

more

Gerontology

FUTURAGE: Can North America learn from Europe's road map for aging research? by Marilynn Larkin, MA-1470

FUTURAGE: Can North America learn from Europe's road map for aging research? by Marilynn Larkin, MA

In October 2011, the European Commission launched the Road Map for European Ageing Research, the result of two years of collaborative efforts by the FUTURAGE project team. That team, under the leadership of Alan Walker, professor of social policy and social gerontology at the United Kingdom’s University of Sheffield, brought together 24 partners, 14 European countries, and more than 700 individual and organizational stakeholders. The resulting road map, according to FUTURAGE, “aims to tackle the grand challenge of Europe’s ageing population and provide the research agenda for ageing over the next 10 years.”

more

Gerontology

The Media's Portrayal of Ageing by Colin Milner, Kay Van Norman, Jenifer Milner-1463

The Media's Portrayal of Ageing by Colin Milner, Kay Van Norman, Jenifer Milner

Has the media’s portrayal of ageing influenced society’s views and responses to population ageing? And if so, why? What messages do the mass media send to society about the later years of life?

more

Gerontology

Sarcopenia: what it is (and is not) and how to deal with it by Alexandra Williams, MA-1383

Sarcopenia: what it is (and is not) and how to deal with it by Alexandra Williams, MA

Although many adults may not know the definition of sarcopenia, they certainly know its effects, as this loss of muscle function and strength can lead to a significantly decreased quality of life or even death. Falls and fractures, impaired mobility, decreased ability to perform tasks of daily living, and a loss of independence are all associated with sarcopenic declines.

more

Gerontology

Total items: 38

icaa 100 members