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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Gerontology

 

The Media's Portrayal of Ageing by Colin Milner, Kay Van Norman, Jenifer Milner-1463

The Media's Portrayal of Ageing by Colin Milner, Kay Van Norman, Jenifer Milner

Has the media’s portrayal of ageing influenced society’s views and responses to population ageing? And if so, why? What messages do the mass media send to society about the later years of life?

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Gerontology

Sarcopenia: what it is (and is not) and how to deal with it by Alexandra Williams, MA-1383

Sarcopenia: what it is (and is not) and how to deal with it by Alexandra Williams, MA

Although many adults may not know the definition of sarcopenia, they certainly know its effects, as this loss of muscle function and strength can lead to a significantly decreased quality of life or even death. Falls and fractures, impaired mobility, decreased ability to perform tasks of daily living, and a loss of independence are all associated with sarcopenic declines.

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Gerontology

Exercise and the aging brain by Terry Eckmann, PhD-1377

Exercise and the aging brain by Terry Eckmann, PhD

Aging and brain health is a topic of great interest as the older-adult population continues to grow. In 1900, the average life expectancy was approximately 47 years, while today’s life expectancy is roughly 78.1 It is estimated that women who now reach age 65 will have an average life expectancy of almost 85 and men who make it to 65 can expect to live to 82.1 Longer life expectancy brings with it the need to maintain a healthy body and brain as the foundation for leading the fullest, most productive life possible.

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Gerontology

Lessons for living: The Legacy Project collects and disseminates elder wisdom by Karl Pillemer, PhD-1338

Lessons for living: The Legacy Project collects and disseminates elder wisdom by Karl Pillemer, PhD

As a professor of Human Development at Cornell University, I have spent the past 25 years studying how people develop, grow and change over the course of their adult lives. Seven years ago, this research interest led me to what I felt was a riveting idea: Why not invite older people to describe the lessons they have learned about living and make this knowledge accessible to people of all ages?

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Gerontology

Tackling graywashing: what drives it, how to recognize and avoid it by Marilynn Larkin, MA-1316

Tackling graywashing: what drives it, how to recognize and avoid it by Marilynn Larkin, MA

Shortly after the launch of the International Council on Active Aging (ICAA)’s Changing the Way We Age® Campaign, ICAA CEO Colin Milner was researching his book chapter for the World Economic Forum when he had an “aha” moment. “In our ICAA publications and press releases about the campaign, we had rightly pointed out that Boomers and their parents are finally becoming a market force,” Milner says. “But the downside to that development is that many companies are now jumping on the bandwagon with products that are completely inappropriate for older adults.” With that, he came up with a word—graywashing—to describe the phenomenon.

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Gerontology

A healthy foundation: understanding older adults’ caloric needs and how to achieve them by Kathryn Porter, MS, RD-1298

A healthy foundation: understanding older adults’ caloric needs and how to achieve them by Kathryn Porter, MS, RD

Determining what, when and why to eat certain foods to meet a target calorie level can be a challenging and daunting task at any age. This task is even greater in later life, however.

Older adults may be experiencing decline in muscle mass, less volume and intensity of physical activity, chronic health conditions, physical limitations, numerous medications, and slower metabolisms. Additionally, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2007–2008 reported that 78% of American men and 69% of American women ages 60 and older were overweight, while 37% and 34% respectively were obese; moreover, 60% of men and 74% of women had abdominal obesity.

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Gerontology

Total items: 34

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