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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Aquatics

 

Catch a current for shallow wave cardio-resistance training by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP-1355

Catch a current for shallow wave cardio-resistance training by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP

When I first met Sandy, a 63-year-old retired woman, she weighed 285 lbs. and measured 50.7 % body fat. She also had a history of significant chronic knee pain. In fact, she was unable to perform any chair stands as a result of this pain. After Sandy completed all her physical therapy sessions, her healthcare providers told her there was nothing more they could do to help.

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Aquatics

Dive into the deep for head-to-toe resistance training by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP-1237

Dive into the deep for head-to-toe resistance training by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP

Maintaining muscle strength and power is vital for functional independent living. Between ages 20 and 40 years, the human body reaches peak muscle mass and force. As the body ages into mid and later life, it undergoes a progressive, generalized loss of muscle mass, strength and power, known as sarcopenia. Aging also may lead to more rapid declines in muscle power compared to strength. Power—the rate of doing work or the time required to do work—affects the performance of activities such as stair climb, sit to stand, walking and agility. To be more “powerful,” muscles need to contract at various speeds.

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Aquatics

Healthy balance, brains & bones, part three: building bones in the pool by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP-1190

Healthy balance, brains & bones, part three: building bones in the pool by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP

Remember Millie? In part one of “Healthy balance, brains & bones,” we met this active 63-year-old who loves water exercise and horseback riding. A knee replacement had left Millie unsure of her balance, and rather than walk across the pasture to her horse, she had stopped riding. After incorporating balance and strengthening exercises into her land and water activity plan, Millie now feels more confident and stable when walking. She is still concerned, however, about taking charge of her bone health. Millie has osteopenia.

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Aquatics

Healthy balance, brains & bones, part two: 'watering' the brain by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP-1169

Healthy balance, brains & bones, part two: 'watering' the brain by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP

Nancy found the phone number she needed as the doorbell rang. But after dashing to the porch, she promptly forgot what she had been doing moments before. Chances are Nancy’s forgetfulness is normal aging. Still, she can take action to help boost her brainpower, store information and stay equipped to do something with it. Smart training targets cognitive and executive function skills.

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Aquatics

Healthy balance, brains & bones, part one: balance training gets wet by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM-1138

Healthy balance, brains & bones, part one: balance training gets wet by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM

Millie is 63 years old with a history of being active. Last year, Millie had a right knee replacement—which her healthcare providers considered successful—and she completed all her physical therapy sessions afterwards. Yet she reported feeling “klutzy and unstable a lot.” When we measured her body composition, we learned that Millie’s total muscle mass was greater in her left leg compared to her right. Her scores for static balance (defined below) showed that she was within healthy norms while standing on her left leg, but beneath normative scores for her age while standing on the right. In addition to these issues, Millie was recently diagnosed with osteopenia (lower-than-normal bone density), putting her at risk for osteoporosis.

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Aquatics

Water sports build participation by Jonathan D. Souder, MS-1088

Water sports build participation by Jonathan D. Souder, MS

If you have a pool, there are two reasons to add games to your water fitness program: Fun and retention.

After teaching water exercise classes for two years, I realized the regular participants needed variety. One day I brought a beach ball to class and we started tossing it. While treading water with no flotation aids, we volleyed the ball and tried to keep it going.

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Aquatics

Total items: 37

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