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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Gerontology

 

Cognitive loss in later life: The challenge for family and community by Stephen C. Brewer, MD, ABFM-6403

Cognitive loss in later life: The challenge for family and community by Stephen C. Brewer, MD, ABFM

As we get older, the risk of developing diseases increases and our ability to effectively deal with those diseases goes down. All debilitating chronic illnesses are difficult to endure, but nonreversible dementias--such as Alzheimer's disease--are some of the hardest. As a family physician, I have followed many patients as they have gracefully aged through the years, and I have helped them deal with the slow changes that can occur in the body and the mind. One of the more difficult changes is a decline in mental function. If a person's memory declines, it becomes more than an issue with the patient--it becomes a family issue. Helping a family manage an individual who may have a chronic debilitating or potentially fatal disease can be challenging, but it is essential in order to provide the best care and quality of life for that person.

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Gerontology

Aging with grace: Jane Friedman models a wonderful way to live by Maestro David Dworkin, MA-6327

Aging with grace: Jane Friedman models a wonderful way to live by Maestro David Dworkin, MA

I am honored and humbled to have served as an ICAA Master Champion since 2011. Through my national and international travels presenting the Conductorcise program, I champion ICAA's mission of "Changing The Way We Age." I have had the opportunity to meet elders across the ranges of age and health status--all amazing human beings in their own unique ways. And as I converse with those in their 80s, 90s, and 100 and beyond, I find they have many commonalities that make them all champions in successful aging. In December 2017 I viewed a YouTube video featuring Jane Friedman, a resident of R.H. Myers Apartments at Menorah Park, Beachwood, Ohio, whose attitude inspired me. In the video Jane sings a Hilarious Song about Getting Old. I felt compelled to reach out.

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Gerontology

Sleep power: Everyone needs their

Sleep power: Everyone needs their "zzzs" to function at their best

There's no question that getting a good night's sleep regularly is good for you, your staff and your constituents. "Sleep is a necessity, not a luxury," said M. Safwan Badr, MD, a past president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), at the 2014 launch of "Sleep Well, Be Well," a campaign of the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project. Yet many people--more than half in a recent AARP/University of Michigan national poll--believe that poor sleep is a normal part of aging, and as a result, they don't seek information on how to improve sleep. But experts agree that many sleep problems--even chronic ones--can be helped by nondrug strategies and behavior changes.

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Gerontology

Strong relationships: A prescription for healthy aging by Jeff Rossman, PhD-6222

Strong relationships: A prescription for healthy aging by Jeff Rossman, PhD

My father, who just turned 90, shared with me on more than one occasion that he has outlived all his lifelong friends. So, when my mother passed away a few years ago, we worried how Dad would fare. We feared the lack of companionship could affect his health and emotional well-being. When Dad told us several months later that he had begun seeing a lovely woman whom he met on the Internet, we were thrilled for him. One of their first dates was for dinner at a senior center to which she belongs. That evening she introduced him to members of the Choraliers, a group of about 50 men and women in their 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s who put on a theatrical production every eight weeks that includes singing, dancing and acting. This piqued Dad's curiosity .... and he decided to join the group. He is excited to attend the rehearsals and be part of a friendly, tight-knit group who share their love of music and provide support and camaraderie to one another. They share a bond that brings joy and a sense of belonging, and helps them age gracefully.

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Gerontology

Hospice on your bucket list: More insights and inspirations by Kimberly Baumgarten, RN, FCN, with Mary E. Sanders, PhD, CDE, ACSM-RCEP, FACSM-5991

Hospice on your bucket list: More insights and inspirations by Kimberly Baumgarten, RN, FCN, with Mary E. Sanders, PhD, CDE, ACSM-RCEP, FACSM

As a geriatric nurse, I see the last season of life as richly beautiful. My passion is to walk alongside others during their toughest times and to teach other professionals not only how to do this too, but also to walk in a way that is a healing balm for all involved. To show that healing can happen to the body, but even if that fails, healing can be brought to the spirits of our residents and their families. I invite you to walk with me as we discuss hospice and end-of-life crossroads. The stories that follow have inspired me. I hope they encourage you, along with your families and your residents or members, to undertake these important conversations.

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Gerontology

Is hospice on your bucket list? by Kimberly Baumgarten, RN, FCN, with Mary E. Sanders, PhD, CDE, ACSM-RCEP, FACSM-5966

Is hospice on your bucket list? by Kimberly Baumgarten, RN, FCN, with Mary E. Sanders, PhD, CDE, ACSM-RCEP, FACSM

When the call came for me to fly home to Indiana, I knew things were critical. My father had contracted Legionnaires pneumonia. He was 77 years old, in poor health and on a ventilator in a hospital's intensive care unit. When I arrived, I instantly went into nursing mode, praying that logic might win over a daughter's fear. I sat down next to my father, watching the monitors--but I knew he was in trouble. From what I was seeing, this man was going to die. At best, he might stay alive a month or two while remaining on a ventilator. As I talked to the doctor about what I was seeing and thinking, he responded in the truest nature of an ICU physician, beginning with all that had been done for my father and what the next step was. I stopped him and asked, "Will this save my father's life or just prolong the inevitable?" The doctor hung his head and said, "Prolong" ... My father made the choice [to remove the ventilator] and we honored it by changing to hospice-based care. ... Trauma or peace? In facing end-of-life experiences, we all may plan the memory we want to leave and support others in planning their own.

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Gerontology

Total items: 38

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