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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Nutrition

 

The Mediterranean Diet: A way of eating for the ages and for the aging by Sara Baer-Sinnott, MA-6322

The Mediterranean Diet: A way of eating for the ages and for the aging by Sara Baer-Sinnott, MA

It seems fitting that as the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid celebrated its 25th anniversary in January 2018, it was also honored as the number one overall diet in America by US News & World Report's annual ranking (tied with the DASH diet). It wasn't always that way. In the early 1990s Americans were clamoring for "no-fat" or "low-fat" foods created by food manufacturers anxious to capitalize on the United States government's low-fat dietary policy. To provide a healthy, research-backed alternative to the US Department of Agriculture's food pyramid, Oldways brought together nutrition scientists, public policy experts, chefs, and food writers for the 1993 International Conference on the Diets of the Mediterranean. The outcome was the ?rst Mediterranean Diet Pyramid, introduced in 1993. Since that time, the diet has become one of the most widely recommended in the world, supported by physicians and nutrition professionals alike. Best of all, it is easy to follow, as it celebrates rich flavors and delicious recipes.

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Nutrition

Nutrition for healthy aging by Lisa Powell, MS, RDN-6314

Nutrition for healthy aging by Lisa Powell, MS, RDN

"Mens sana in corpore sano"--this Latin phrase translates to "healthy mind in a healthy body," surely a universal goal for aging gracefully and well. Many assume that decreasing fitness levels, failing health, frailty and decline in cognitive function are unavoidable with aging, but people can do much to help maintain healthy function into their 70s, 80s and beyond. Nutrition is a key factor in healthy aging. While calorie needs decrease with age, nutrient needs typically do not--in fact, the need for some nutrients, such as protein, appears to increase. Good choices can provide the body with the best nutrients and fuel for optimal wellness at any age.

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Nutrition

Recognizing and addressing malnutrition in our communities by Alexandra Lewin-Zwerdling, PhD, MPA, Judy Simon, MS, RD, LDN, and Mary Walsh, MEd-5805

Recognizing and addressing malnutrition in our communities by Alexandra Lewin-Zwerdling, PhD, MPA, Judy Simon, MS, RD, LDN, and Mary Walsh, MEd

Regular activity is fundamental to healthy aging. Yet so is our diet, and one that lacks key nutrients has an enormous effect on our ability to be active and remain independent. Many studies document the connection between diet and activity, underscoring that the two must work together for us to achieve a healthy lifestyle, especially as we age. Poor diets can increase bone loss, reduce cognitive function, delay recovery times and prolong periods of hospitalization; they can also accelerate loss of muscle mass. ... The state of being poorly nourished, commonly known as malnutrition, remains a prevalent public health problem particularly for older adults. Yet for many aging experts, it goes largely unnoticed.

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Nutrition

Why muscle mass matters by Ashley Bronston, MS, RDN, and Menghua Luo, MD, PhD-5700

Why muscle mass matters by Ashley Bronston, MS, RDN, and Menghua Luo, MD, PhD

We know that aging causes changes in body composition; a decrease in muscle and an increase in fat tissue. This loss of muscle mass and strength is referred to as sarcopenia, the Greek term meaning “poverty of the flesh.” This article offers a review (or refresher) on muscle, body composition and the older adult for active-aging professionals. The older adults with whom these professionals work cover the functional spectrum--from frail individuals who need ongoing assistance, to athletes who challenge themselves to improve their performance. While their fitness levels and functional abilities will differ, clients or residents can all take steps to enhance muscle health. The question is: Why does muscle matter?

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Nutrition

Agent of lifestyle change: Dr. Andrew Weil sows health for the whole person by Colin Milner-5341

Agent of lifestyle change: Dr. Andrew Weil sows health for the whole person by Colin Milner

No one can deny Dr. Andrew Weil’s bold views or his real impact when it comes to a more holistic approach to health at all ages. Known as the "father of integrative medicine," this renowned physician and author discusses eating for health, aging well, and transforming healthcare. He stresses the need for "a culture of health," as well as promoting health and preventing disease.

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Nutrition

More than nourishment: a wellness approach to dining services by Maureen Janowski, RD, LDN-1321

More than nourishment: a wellness approach to dining services by Maureen Janowski, RD, LDN

Food is at the heart of many cultures and it is certainly a focal point in most senior living communities. Twenty years ago, the word food would have conjured up two images in the retirement community environment: nourishment and socialization. Planning a healthy menu and ensuring a pleasant dining experience were the main priorities. In terms of diet, food was thought of as a reactive treatment—what foods to avoid or limit. In today’s world, we now know that food can be proactive. It is more than nourishment and socialization.

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Nutrition

Total items: 21

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