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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Osteoporosis

 

Refresher course on calcium Prepared by the Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health-512

Refresher course on calcium Prepared by the Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health

Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the human body, has several important functions. More than 99% of total body calcium is stored in the bones and teeth where it functions to support their structure [1]. The remaining one percent is found throughout the body in blood, muscle and the fluid between cells. Calcium is needed for muscle contraction, blood vessel contraction and expansion, the secretion of hormones and enzymes, and sending messages through the nervous system [2]. A constant level of calcium is maintained in body fluid and tissues so that these vital body processes function efficiently.

Bone undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption (breakdown of bone) and deposition of calcium into newly deposited bone (bone formation) [2]. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes as people age. During childhood there is a higher amount of bone formation and less breakdown. In early and middle adulthood, these processes are relatively equal.

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Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis affects ethnic groups-511

Osteoporosis affects ethnic groups

Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by low bone mass, which makes bones fragile and susceptible to fracture. Osteoporosis is known as a silent disease because symptoms and pain do not appear until a fracture occurs.

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Osteoporosis

The BEST exercise program for osteoporosis prevention by Lauve Metcalfe, MS-508

The BEST exercise program for osteoporosis prevention by Lauve Metcalfe, MS

Osteoporosis is a significant health problem in the United States. More than 25 million people are affected, most of whom (80%) are women. Women who are not receiving hormone replacement therapy, are not consuming adequate amounts of calcium and are inactive can lose 20% to 30% of their bone mass between 40 and 70 years of age. As a result, women have a 40% fracture risk throughout their lifetime, with more than 1.5 million fractures per year attributed to osteoporosis (Going, Lohman, Houtkooper, et al, 2003).

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Osteoporosis

Screening clients for osteoporosis   by Sara Meeks, P.T., M.S., G.C.S.-159

Screening clients for osteoporosis by Sara Meeks, P.T., M.S., G.C.S.

About 55% of people ages 50 or above are at risk for osteoporosis, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF).(1) Studies of the population at large indicate that most people do not think they have osteoporosis, and even those who know they have the disease are confused about what to do about it. Identifying individuals with osteoporosis or those at risk will help health and wellness professionals to develop safe and effective exercise programs for their older clients.

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Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis: exercise as prevention and treatment by Colin Milner-143

Osteoporosis: exercise as prevention and treatment by Colin Milner

More than 10 million people ages 50 and older have osteoporosis, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), a Washington, D.C.-based organization that raises awareness of osteoporosis and its prevention and treatment. A further 34 million adults in the same age group, or 55% of people ages 50 and above, have osteopenia (low bone mass). This condition increases an individual’s exposure to osteoporosis. Contrary to popular belief, people of all ages, sexes, races and ethnicities can develop osteoporosis, although the disease is four times more common in women than men.

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Osteoporosis

Making bone health a priority by Colin Milner-53

Making bone health a priority by Colin Milner

Aging baby boomers may put their bones at risk if they ignore a recent call to action by the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF). The organization has challenged boomers to take better care of their bones, as research reveals bone health is a significant problem in the United States. NOF prevalence figures estimate 44 million Americans aged 50 and above have low bone mass or osteoporosis. By 2020, this number will climb to an estimated 61 million men and women if bone health does not become a priority.

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Osteoporosis

Total items: 6

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