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What's new: The business case for wellness programs in senior living.

CONFERENCE, SUMMIT & TRADE SHOW

ICAA 2019: Shaping the future of wellness
October 10-12, 2019
Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center
Orlando, Florida

Sessions: Thursday, October 18, 2018

Tracks

Cognitive & emotional health: programs, activities, methods to support these dimensions
Employee wellness: integrating employees, launching initiative, motivation and tracking results
Leadership & management: partnerships, management, leadership of staff/wellness culture
Physical activity: exercise, recreational activity, balance, how to plan and deliver activities
Programming: multidimensional calendars, single programs, development, content
Research: findings with practical application for wellness dimensions or business process
Trends & innovations: innovations in the field, technologies, “big picture” topics
Walkabout: suited to outdoors; techniques for small spaces
Wellness for health: therapists/wellness staff coordination, program benefits

7:00 a.m.–8:15 a.m.

Secrets to teaching with the three languages of movementLawrence Biscontini

Gain immediate takeaways to engage and motivate your clients and classes. Replace commonly used terms and language such as “senior center,” “take it from the top,” “don’t forget to breathe,” “march it out,” “if you can’t do that, here’s the modification,” and “lift those knees, people.” Learn updated language skills to involve, not alienate, your active-aging friends.

You’ll be able to:

  • Explain the value of three-dimensional teaching verbally, visually and kinesthetically.
  • Apply five updated tips for kinesthetic and visual cueing for active aging.
  • Use 10 updates to fitness nomenclature for active aging and fitness instruction.

Faculty: Lawrence Biscontini, MA, Mindful Movement Specialist, FG 2000.
LM | CEUs

How a positive approach to dementia care can result in better outcomesAJ Cipperly

Explore information and skill building in working with a person living with dementia, focusing on what is retained as well as lost. Understand the value of the relationship with the individual in relation to daily caregiving tasks. Common interactions will be decoded. Practice techniques essential to successful care partnering, therapy sessions and therapeutic relationships.

You’ll be able to:

  • Describe symptoms of dementia that impact care initiation and care provision with regard to what is retained and what is lost in the brain in dementia.
  • Demonstrate Positive Physical Approach™ (PPA) and common modifications by level of dementia that can reduce distress, encourage acceptance of assistance, and improve outcomes for both people living with dementia and providers.
  • Describe and demonstrate effective combinations of multimodal helping techniques, emphasizing use of preserved abilities.

Faculty: AJ Cipperly, MEd, National Director of Memory Care and Training, Validus Senior Living/Inspired Living.
CE | CEUs

How to build a labyrinth for total wellnessLaurie Moore Jones

Through a collaboration between a chaplain and a life enrichment wellness director, a labyrinth program was created to promote wellness in body, mind and soul. Find out how to create a labyrinth in your setting. Simple, low-cost, low-impact strategies will be shared to create a labyrinth in almost any flex space. Learn how to transform this program for secular, nonsecular or multicultural populations.

You’ll be able to:

  • Determine collaborative opportunities to further whole-person wellness programming for older adults.
  • Implement a successful program that incorporates additional multidimensional wellness opportunities involving familiar tools such as guided meditation, prayer and meditative walking into programming schedules.
  • Use the tools provided to implement a single program that is appropriate for all levels of care and incorporates all dimensions of wellness. Use techniques to engage and integrate individuals residing in multiple levels of care in one interactive, dynamic and inclusive program.

Faculty: Laurie Moore Jones, BS, MS, Community Life Enrichment and Wellness Director, The Village of Utz Terrace, SpiriTrust Lutheran.
P | CEUs

Alive with Music! Experience an intergenerational music and mentoring programMary Knysh & Lulu Leathley

The Alive with Music program promotes drumming and music-making to enhance social and emotional wellness plus intergenerational community-building. Older adults are trained and mentored to share activities. Learn simple, accessible and fun rhythmic activities designed to address key factors for aging well. Explore music as a means for expressive nonverbal communication.

You’ll be able to:

  • Practice breath, voice and movement icebreakers that build basic rhythmic skills, advance group teamwork, and improve focus and concentration.
  • Lead easy and fun rhythmic activities in your community to enhance the five core elements of wellness, including an enhanced sense of identity, belonging, value, purpose and joy.
  • Identify and use three types of improvisational techniques for building nonverbal communication, adaptability, and increased self-expression and group connection.

Faculty: Mary Knysh, Founder, Rhythmic Connections, and professional musician and trainer for Music for People Organization; and Lulu Leathley, BA, Founder, Lulu Jam.
P | CEUs

Chair to standing progressions for older-adult group exercise classesCindy Kozacek

Have you struggled with different capabilities in a group exercise setting? Learn specific programming for participants who need to remain seated in a chair, then take those same exercises to standing with chair support. Gain examples for strength, cardio and flexibility group-exercise programming and how you can help a seated client progress to the same workouts while standing.

You’ll be able to:

  • Lead effective exercise programming for participants who need to remain seated in a chair.
  • Progress that same programming to standing with chair support.
  • Use a full sample class in your community or organization that includes strength, cardio and flexibility training.

Faculty: Cindy Kozacek, ACE, AFAA, Senior Fitness Programming Consultant, CK Fitness.
PA | CEUs

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Improvisation training: Social engagement for spirit, mind and bodyRoxy Kline

When you think of improvisation, you may think of stand-up comedians with quick-witted responses and one-liners. Although a common side effect of improvisation is laughter, being funny is not required. This master class will prepare and inspire you to lead your own improv classes. Explore skills necessary to create socially engaging and safe improv experiences for participants.

You’ll be able to:

  • Identify the outcome goals of improvisation aimed at enhancing the quality of life for your older adults.
  • Identify the coaching techniques needed to provide a positive experience for all participants.
  • Utilize the tools provided to implement improvisation into your existing wellness programs.

Faculty: Roxy Kline, ACE, Director of Healthy Living and Active Aging Expert, YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities.
P | CEUs

Cultivating happiness: A mind-body approach to optimal health and well-beingShirley Archer

Your challenge—be happy! Happiness impacts mental and physical well-being. Research shows happiness boosts immunity and reduces sickness and disease risks. Happiness is also contagious. Join this session to learn about happiness science and evidence-based techniques to boost happiness for yourself and those around you. Practice some happiness exercises as well.

You’ll be able to:

  • Define happiness from a scientific perspective and understand findings in “happiness science,” aka positive psychology.
  • Discuss research that supports the benefits of happiness to mental and physical health and well-being.
  • Identify and implement specific techniques to boost happiness levels.

Faculty: Shirley Archer, JD, MA, Shirley S. Archer Associates, LLC.
R | CEUs

Using ROI analysis to gain funding for your wellness programsTed Teele

Gain financial insights in this hands-on workshop for wellness professionals. Learn how to use ROI analyses to show your program is a “must-have” for your organization. Explore models to calculate two simple ROI analyses—financial and community—which will show the wellness program’s value to the success of the community and facilitate approval. Leave with ROI calculation templates.

You’ll be able to:

  • Comprehend how ROI analyses often help organizations decide which investments to make, and specifically, which investments are a priority.
  • Use a simple approach to creating a financial ROI analysis. This includes how to make assumptions about the impact of your program on critical organizational metrics, such as average length of stay and overall occupancy.
  • Create a community ROI analysis that shows how your program gives back to the community, helping to maintain your not-for-profit status.

Faculty: Ted Teele, BA, MBA, CEO, Touchtown.
LM | CEUs

Don’t remember what you forgot? Maximizing attention and memoryLinda Sasser

Understanding how memory works is essential for learning and applying strategies to improve memory and to help clients with their memory. Discover common reasons for forgetting, experience the impact of attention and multitasking on memory and task performance, and practice techniques for improving long-term memory.

You’ll be able to:

  • Describe how the brain processes and stores information and why it forgets.
  • Explain how attention and multitasking impact memory, and identify ways to increase attention.
  • Use strategies to improve your retention and recall of names, information and tasks.

Faculty: Linda Sasser, PhD, Owner, Brain and Memory Health.
CE | CEUs

Journey to wellness: Integrating employee wellness into an organization’s cultural frameworkKathleen Weissberg & Amy Jones

Explore the journey of three providers who undertook an employee wellness challenge and how rehabilitation practitioners assisted to integrate person-centered wellness programs into their culture. Gain an overview of the need for employee wellness, statistics related to employee health, and elements of a comprehensive program. Lessons learned are presented.

You’ll be able to:

  • Explore the essential elements of a comprehensive employee wellness program that addresses the varying needs of an organization's workforce and incorporates six dimensions of wellness.
  • Discuss ways to engage your leadership team and staff to encourage an organization-wide culture of wellness.
  • Hear how three successful organizations engaged staff to develop healthy habits and keep employees motivated and engaged.

Faculty: Kathleen Weissberg, OTD, Director of Education, and Amy Jones, COTA, Business Development Manager, Select Rehabilitation.
EW | CEUs

Movement progressions and options for the older adult–Foundations, principles and practiceLibby Norris & Ruth Parliament

Gain a master plan for progressions/regressions to help you create workouts that can be easily adapted to a broad range of ability and mobility. Leave with creative ideas to accommodate daily variances with ability and energy with regression options using a variety of equipment. Explore suitability and approaches with equipment and training for specific populations.

You’ll be able to:

  • Describe the foundation and principles of progressions/regressions for multilevel exercise and classes. Explain the principles in creating a plan for progression/regression for a broad range of ability and mobility.
  • Introduce the foundation functional exercises required for a safe, effective workout to support activities of daily living. Explain tools and resources to easily create workouts for multilevel programs.
  • Identify creative options for progressions/regressions with limited space and/or equipment. Introduce the concept of experiential and interactive learning opportunity to review key movement patterns to support daily living activities.

Faculty: Libby Norris, BA, Fitness Manager, City of Mississauga; and Ruth Parliament, BSc, MA, Faculty, Conestoga College.
PA | CEUs

Memory, cognition and brain wellness with exerciseJackie Russell & David Zid

Experience how exercise enhances brain wellness, and may positively impact the progression of neurologic age-related changes. Neuroplasticity, the brain’s ability to create new circuits, may be the driving mechanism behind positive changes in the aging brain. Learn exercise agendas that may sharpen memory, cognition, and perhaps impact the progression of dementia.

You’ll be able to:

  • Describe how exercise may enhance the process of neuroplasticity and its importance in preserving brain wellness and efficiency.
  • Identify key components of a successful exercise program for people trying to preserve brain wellness across the aging continuum.
  • Integrate specific evidenced-based exercise agendas using high-intensity aerobics followed by focused cognitive/dual-tasking protocols to make recommendations for a fitness plan for brain wellness maintenance in the aging population.

Faculty: Jackie Russell, RN, BSN, CNOR, Cofounder and Program Development Coordinator, and David Zid, BA, ACE, APG, Cofounder and Director of Movement Disorder/Musculoskeletal Wellness, OhioHealth Delay the Disease.
CE | CEUs

Fall prevention with tai chiDianne Bailey

The cost of falls every year is in the billions. Tai chi is an easy-to-learn protocol that is proven to improve balance and reduce the risk of falling. Discover some of the moves in tai chi and how they apply to balance improvement. You will be introduced to the many research studies that prove tai chi as a viable vehicle for fall prevention.

You’ll be able to:

  • Comprehend the research behind tai chi as a fall prevention protocol.
  • Utilize the movements learned immediately in your sessions/classes to improve balance and reduce falls.
  • Assist your clientele in understanding how tai chi can improve balance and improve their ability to move with confidence.

Faculty: Dianne Bailey, CSCS, FAS, Open the Door to Tai Chi and Functional Aging Institute.
PA | CEUs

10:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

ICAA GENERAL SESSION

How the age wave will transform wellness, longevity and medicineKen Dychtwald

Rising longevity and the aging of Boomers worldwide are radically altering both the demographic landscape and every aspect of the consumer marketplace. In coming years, we'll see explosive business growth fueled by this unprecedented age wave. Health and wellness-related sectors will be the most impacted. Dr. Ken Dychtwald offers a revealing glimpse into the future in this special presentation for ICAA and explores such questions as: How long might we live? How will we spend our “longevity bonus” years? Will our later years be a time of health and vitality or illness and disability? What advances are needed in medical/nursing skills, preventive and rehab fitness, functional nutrition and crowdsourced scientific advances to ensure our health span matches our life span? Will super-longevity be purchasable on the open or black market? And what will be the new role of modern elders? Dr. Dychtwald is a foremost visionary and original thinker regarding the lifestyle, marketing, healthcare, financial and workforce implications of the age wave.

You’ll be able to:

  • Comprehend that living increasingly longer lives with vitality and purpose, or with sickness and suffering, will greatly depend on our ability to reshape the skills, services and incentives of the current healthcare and wellness system.
  • Outline the critical course corrections that the healthcare and wellness industries need to undertake to support healthy aging and more productive longer lives.
  • Discuss the necessity of preventing, delaying and eliminating such diseases of aging as Alzheimer’s with scientific breakthroughs; training healthcare and wellness professionals to become “aging-ready”; making disease prevention a national priority; and more.

Faculty: Ken Dychtwald, PhD, founding CEO, Age Wave, and psychologist, gerontologist, business advisor, documentary filmmaker and best-selling author.
CEUs

11:35 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

ICAA TRADE SHOW GRAND OPENING

Join us for the opening of the ICAA Trade Show, an expo targeted to the active-aging industry. At previous ICAA Conferences, most attendees have explored the trade show to learn about new products and services that may offer them a competitive advantage in the marketplace or provide better solutions for their clients or organizations. Take this opportunity as a wise buyer to do your research, and learn the stories behind the products and services needed for success. More than a trade show, ICAA’s expo is your opportunity to discover new possibilities to ignite your wellness efforts.

3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

PANEL Maintaining a culture of wellness for those with the invisible struggle of incontinenceMelissa Weston, Verna Chisman, Jennifer Trent & Leah Klusch

Most people think of fitness, activity and socialization when they think of wellness. Often overlooked is the invisible challenge many older adults face alone—incontinence. This condition can impact all dimensions of wellness. As we strive to restore continence with exercise, fear of an accident may cause individuals to withdraw and become isolated. Without proper care, incontinence can result in significant health conditions and even falls.

You’ll be able to:

  • Recognize the signs that someone is struggling with incontinence and identify tactics on how to talk with residents about ways to manage these challenges.
  • Comprehend how sleep hygiene and incontinence are related to ultimately impact quality and satisfaction scores in addition to decreasing the risk of falls.
  • Examine new ways to engage community stakeholders to manage resident incontinence as well as design and integrate paths to restore some continence among community members.

Faculty: Melissa Weston, BS, Vice President, Business Development and Sales Operations, Domtar (moderator); Verna Chisman, President, Allure Wellness Management Services; Jennifer Trent; and Leah Klusch, BSN, Executive Director, The Alliance Training Center.
R | CEUs

Add variety to your lifestyle services while increasing revenuesKaren Lloyd

It's unusual for a lifestyle team to think about revenue. In senior living, it's usually considered a necessary cost center. Often teams that deliver programs have a hard time expanding options due to limited staffing. Explore various wellness and lifestyle components that can add variety to the resident experience, grow a lifestyle team and add to the bottom line. Share your ideas.

You’ll be able to:

  • Express a vision of lifestyle program growth.
  • Grow a lifestyle team to expand the resident experience.
  • Contribute to the revenue stream for your community or organization.

Faculty: Karen Lloyd, BM, Director of Lifestyle, Friendship Village of Bloomington.
LM | CEUs

Social media strategies, shortcuts and systemsDebra Atkinson

Discover how to create a strategy and then a system (Social 365) to get more predictable, consistent results from social media across your staff and outsourced support, or just to keep your hair on! You'll identify where your customers are, realize what is currently working best for social media, and see examples of who is using it well and what to avoid.

You’ll be able to:

  • Identify three types of content that boost Search Engine Optimization and reach target customers.
  • List top four priorities in using social media to attract new customers and communicate with current customers to become an industry influencer.
  • Create a system (Social 365) that can be shared within an agency among staff members for smarter use of social media.

Faculty: Debra Atkinson, MS, CSCS, Voice for Fitness, LLC/Flipping Fifty.
LM | CEUs

PANEL Maintaining a culture of wellness for those with the invisible struggle of incontinenceMelissa Weston, Verna Chisman, Jennifer Trent & Leah Klusch

Most people think of fitness, activity and socialization when they think of wellness. Often overlooked is the invisible challenge many older adults face alone—incontinence. This condition can impact all dimensions of wellness. As we strive to restore continence with exercise, fear of an accident may cause individuals to withdraw and become isolated. Without proper care, incontinence can result in significant health conditions and even falls.

You’ll be able to:

  • Recognize the signs that someone is struggling with incontinence and identify tactics on how to talk with residents about ways to manage these challenges.
  • Comprehend how sleep hygiene and incontinence are related to ultimately impact quality and satisfaction scores in addition to decreasing the risk of falls.
  • Examine new ways to engage community stakeholders to manage resident incontinence as well as design and integrate paths to restore some continence among community members.

Faculty: Melissa Weston, BS, Vice President, Business Development and Sales Operations, Domtar (moderator); Verna Chisman, Director of Wellness, John Knox Village; Jennifer Trent; and Leah Klusch, BSN, Executive Director, The Alliance Training Center.
R | CEUs

Beyond the traditional sit-to-stand exercise: Balance, mobility, proprioception and chair navigationKim Eichinger

Have you heard someone has fallen out of a chair or tripped and fell while trying to find a seat? “Chair related” falls are an opportunity to create an exercise program specific to the function of taking a seat. Think beyond traditional sit-to-stand exercise. Learn to format exercises to target not only strength and range of motion, but also sensory systems involved in navigating a chair while maintaining balance.

You’ll be able to:

  • Draw insight from fall reports and observation of residents in motion to determine chair mobility challenges and create exercise formats to improve transfer ability and reduce fall risk.
  • Address habits that can lead to increased fall risk and instill safe practices that support more mindful movement and body awareness.
  • Create an enjoyable exercise experience using all aspects of a chair and make adaptions to meet participant level of mobility. Learn to perform simple assessments to measure progress.

Faculty: Kim Eichinger, ACE, Executive Director of Fitness, Country Meadows Retirement Communities.
PA | CEUs

10 three to five minute “Workins”Terry Eckmann

Lack of time is the top excuse for not exercising. Individuals may also perceive a 30-minute workout as overwhelming. Finding ways to engage in meaningful movement can boost residents’ NEAT (nonexercise associated thermogenesis) and prevent musculoskeletal imbalances and injuries. “Workins” are for everybody who wants to keep body/brain in balance and fit fitness into daily living.

You’ll be able to:

  • Comprehend the health risks of too much sitting and explore NEAT (nonexercise activity thermogenesis).
  • Use 10 three to five minute “workins” that boost NEAT and prevent muscle imbalances that lead to common injuries.
  • Identify key instructional cues for teaching movement.

Faculty: Terry Eckmann, PhD, Professor, Minot State University.
PA | CEUs

Sole strengthCammy Dennis & Jessica Pinkowski

Bare your “soles” for an energizing barefoot workout! Sole Strength fuses low-impact movement with strength, balance and gait training exercises. Shoes can inhibit the use of many muscles and joints in the feet. By freeing your feet, you will discover new ways to awaken energy and balance in your body. This workout is carefully crafted to build endurance, strength and improve flexibility.

You’ll be able to:

  • Develop a complete barefoot class that meet the needs of active-aging adults.
  • Incorporate different “blocks” of exercise designed to improve strength, flexibility, balance and gait function.
  • Discuss how to heighten the sensory system of the body to facilitate balance and recruit mobility through the foot and ankle.

Faculty: Cammy Dennis, BBA, CPT, Fitness Director, and Jessica Pinkowski, CPT, NPI-CPS, Group Fitness Supervisor, On Top of the World Communities, Inc.
PA | CEUs

4:45 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Intentional leadership: Creating compassionate connectionsHeather Stanton & Cindy Senk

In yoga practice, intentions represent what we aspire to be; goals and wishes we manifest with love, compassion and conviction. Explore your strengths and challenges to develop as a compassionate leader. Use yoga asanas (postures), breathwork and meditation as focal points for self-exploration and self-awareness. Techniques include journaling, and shared collaborative learning.

You’ll be able to:

  • Identify three strengths that will enable you to be an intentional, compassionate leader.
  • Identify and utilize tools and practices that will enhance your leadership style.
  • Practice your leadership skills through collaborative learning, using various scenarios and practical situations.

Faculty: Heather Stanton, BA, Director of Resident Services, and Cindy Senk, MEd, Fitness and Wellness Director, Seabury.
EW | CEUs

Taking your wellness program “to infinity and beyond!”Stacey Judge & Kristen Grant

In yoga practice, intentions represent what we aspire to be; goals and wishes we manifest with love, compassion and conviction. Explore your strengths and challenges to develop as a compassionate leader. Use yoga asanas (postures), breathwork and meditation as focal points for self-exploration and self-awareness. Techniques include journaling, and shared collaborative learning.

You’ll be able to:

  • Use techniques to better engage residents and staff in the design and development of innovative programming.
  • Identify the keys to developing wellness programs that involve the broader community.
  • Develop tools that will track positive outcomes and provide a return on your investment from social accountability to increased length of stay.

Faculty: Stacey Judge, BS, CG, Wellness Program Director, Springpoint Senior Living; and Kristen Grant, BS, Director of Resident Services, Winchester Gardens, a Springpoint community.
P | CEUs

Create a company culture based on people, purpose and performanceKaren Woodard

How happy are people at every level to be a part of your organization? Are your people excited to do more than is expected in their roles? Of course, you have some “rock stars” and likely some “rocks” as well—most organizations do. Gain tools to assess how the culture of your organization works for or against you and how to improve it with a focus on people, purpose and performance.

You’ll be able to:

  • Recognize how organizations create dysfunction and unhappiness, and how to transform them.
  • Explain the motivated role for employees.
  • Discuss why happy people matter and the importance of values-based agreements.

Faculty: Karen Woodard, President, Premium Performance Training.
LM | CEUs

Brain wellness training in memory care: What works?Cynthia Green

As memory care shifts to person-centered approaches using rehabilitation models, interest in brain wellness training for those with memory challenge grows. But what is the science behind such training, and what really works? Attendees will learn the latest research on brain wellness training in memory care, including how such interventions may impact function and the disease course. We will look at different programming perspectives, reviewing the pros and cons of each. Attendees will leave with a better understanding of the use of brain wellness training in memory care and criteria they can use to evaluate the appropriateness of available programs for their communities.

You’ll be able to:

  • Understand the science of memory wellness training in the memory care setting.
  • Understand how brain wellness interventions may benefit clients with memory challenge.
  • Be better able to evaluate brain wellness programs for their setting.

Faculty: Cynthia Green, PhD, President, Total Brain Health.
CE | CEUs

The MIND diet: An opportunity for programming collaboration between culinary services and active engagement departmentsConnie Dow & Shannon Wilson

Eating well and staying physically/mentally active are key to aging well. Learn about a brief history of diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, current statistics on prevalence and potential for future numbers. Hear research behind the MIND diet and its potential to reduce risk, plus exercises to improve cognitive function. Explore how culinary services and active engagement departments can collaborate to create a well-rounded presentation.

You’ll be able to:

  • Identify the 10 foods to include in the MIND diet.
  • Identify the five foods to avoid when adhering to the MIND diet.
  • Identify three other physical and mental strategies to help improve cognitive function.

Faculty: Connie Dow, RDN, LDN, National Dietitian, and Shannon Wilson, BA, ACC, CDP, Manager of Engage Life Operations, Atria Senior Living.
P | CEUs

Out with the old and in with the older!Lawrence Biscontini & Bernadette O'Brien

This session offers a theoretical and practical application of what it means to train older adults today. Teaching this population, the “chronologically enriched,” involves a new mindset and a new toolbox for group and personal trainers. Experience a discussion of “age,” new general guidelines, and practical stories of movements, successes and inspiration to take home to your clients.

You’ll be able to:

  • Restate the five types of ages and what research says about training and reversing four of them.
  • Relate the triplanar system for safe, effective warmups based on ACE, SCW and AFAA standards.
  • Explain the importance of training anterior tibialis and quadratus lumborum for gait recovery and gait efficiency.

Faculty: Lawrence Biscontini, MA, Mindful Movement Specialist, and Bernadette O’Brien, MA, Mindful Movement Motivator, FG 2000.
PA | CEUs

Strong & steady–Strategies for preventing fallsSharlyn Green

Delve into the connection between cognitive and physical decline that can happen with age, and the increased incidence of falls. Explore walking gait and learn to evaluate movement deficiencies to create programs that stabilize and mobilize individuals of varied abilities. Learn to create strategies that improve factors key to preventing falls (e.g., concentration, balance, core strength, reaction time).

You’ll be able to:

  • Identify the risk factors that lead to increased risk of falls in older adults.
  • Individualize and modify exercise options in order to improve movement efficiencies for those of various skill and fitness levels.
  • Implement fall prevention strategies in a variety of fitness class designs.

Faculty: Sharlyn Green, MBA, Campus Resident Programs Director, Freedom Plaza Peoria.
WFH | CEUs

STOTT PILATES® Matwork Programming for Osteoporosis ManagementLaureen Dubeau

Clients with osteoporosis face issues when looking for a suitable exercise program. This workout, developed by the Merrithew team, shares programming ideas using a mat and small props, taking into account different forms of the condition and how they affect clients. Use the biomechanical foundation of STOTT PILATES to discover how to create programs that address this population’s specific needs.

You’ll be able to:

  • Comprehend the characteristics of osteoporosis and discuss contraindicated movements in various parts of the body.
  • Assess risk and design a program that is appropriate for a variety of levels of exerciser.
  • Explore how selected STOTT PILATES Matwork exercises and various light props can aid in exercise programming.

Faculty: Laureen Dubeau, BFA, Master Instructor Trainer, Merrithew.
WFH | CEUs

Sunset wellness walk #Agingadventures #BedifferentTracey Harvey & Bailey Turpin

(Note: This session meets in the Beacon Rotunda.)

Recharge with this approximately two-mile interactive, scenic coastal city walk. Learn how to inspire and explore new ways to engage residents’ participation with “old school” games while boosting the physical, intellectual, occupational, spiritual, emotional, environmental and social wellness dimensions. Have fun, explore and adopt new practices for working with active agers.

You’ll be able to:

  • Ignite current activities and wellness programming by applying fresh ideas that help increase functional mobility, mindfulness and visual scanning skills, to name a few, with “old school” games.
  • Delineate and interpret the benefits of how scavenger hunts, pictures and music can positively affect aging adults of all abilities.
  • Boost operational success while gaining valuable connections, resources and ideas from fellow attendees. Leave with a fresh innovative outlook that can translate into more compelling activities on your wellness calendar.

Faculty: Tracey Harvey, BS, National Program Director, Wellness Services, EnerG® Wellness by Aegis Therapies; and Bailey Turpin, BS, CWP, Director of Training and Customer Support, EnerG Wellness.
W | CEUs

6:20 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

MIX & MINGLE

Before you head out to explore Long Beach’s restaurants and nightlife, come and meet other members of the ICAA Conference community. Enjoy light snacks and a drink while you socialize with your team members, industry colleagues, corporate partners, and ICAA staff and volunteers. Leave feeling energized by lively conversations with others who are passionate about active aging. This informal networking event will take place in the trade show hall at the Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center.

icaa 100 members