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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Social wellness

 

Music for wellness: innovative ways to bring music to your clients by Marilynn Larkin, MA-4612

Music for wellness: innovative ways to bring music to your clients by Marilynn Larkin, MA

Few Journal on Active Aging readers would question that music has a positive impact in their communities and organizations, and much research supports that concept. Research also has shown that music has a beneficial and therapeutic role to play with older adults with dementia. This article highlights three different approaches for incorporating music into a community or center. While all the programs described have demonstrated benefits for healthy older adults, they also have a vital role to play in the lives of individuals with memory loss.

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Social wellness

The Arts and Health Project: supporting healthy aging through the arts by Jenifer Milner-1537

The Arts and Health Project: supporting healthy aging through the arts by Jenifer Milner

In the year 2000, as the world contemplated the potential of a new century, Gene D. Cohen, MD, PhD, contemplated the potential of aging. To this potential, as well as damaging myths of aging, Cohen drew the public’s attention in his then-new book The Creative Age: Awakening Human Potential in the Second Half of Life. He heralded “a new juncture” in the field of aging—“one in which we move beyond studies of what aging is to what is possible with aging.

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Social wellness

Exergamers Wellness Clubs: boosting physical activity, socialization and quality of life for older adults by Marilynn Larkin, MA-1503

Exergamers Wellness Clubs: boosting physical activity, socialization and quality of life for older adults by Marilynn Larkin, MA

Recognition of the benefits of play for older adults continues to grow, as does momentum for ways to facilitate it. In the May/June 2012 issue of the Journal on Active Aging®, we explored the emerging trend of older-adult playgrounds. In this article, we delve into a pilot program aimed at improving the health and well-being of older people in Los Angeles, California, through “exergames”—video games that involve sports and exercise—and other components.

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Social wellness

Programs to bridge the generations engage all ages by Jenifer Milner-1490

Programs to bridge the generations engage all ages by Jenifer Milner

Today, even as population aging becomes more apparent,1 we continue to hear about the challenges that will accompany this demographic shift, and little about the rich resource that age 50-plus adults represent for society. The potential of older people is devalued at a time when many are living longer, remain active and seek meaningful ways to participate in their communities.

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Social wellness

Creative arts and aging: improvisation by Roxy Kline-1448

Creative arts and aging: improvisation by Roxy Kline

Everyone is aging. Agreed? But how we age is determined, in part, by what we do with our years. George Bernard Shaw said, “We don’t stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing.” Whatever age, mental or physical ability, older adults can participate in the arts. Improvisation is just one of many creative arts tools that can be used to provide opportunities for social interaction in a playful and fun atmosphere.

When most people think of improvisation, they think of stand-up comedians with clever, quick-witted responses and one-liners. Although a common side effect of improvisation is laughter, being clever or funny is not a necessary skill. Stop thinking about improvisation as “acting.” Instead, look at the root word “improvise” (defined as “to invent, compose, or perform with little or no preparation”).

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Social wellness

Lessons for living: The Legacy Project collects and disseminates elder wisdom by Karl Pillemer, PhD-1339

Lessons for living: The Legacy Project collects and disseminates elder wisdom by Karl Pillemer, PhD

As a professor of Human Development at Cornell University, I have spent the past 25 years studying how people develop, grow and change over the course of their adult lives. Seven years ago, this research interest led me to what I felt was a riveting idea: Why not invite older people to describe the lessons they have learned about living and make this knowledge accessible to people of all ages?

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Social wellness

Total items: 23

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