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What's new: The business case for wellness programs in senior living.

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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Research

 

The wellness workforce leads in job satisfaction by Patricia Ryan, MS-5616

The wellness workforce leads in job satisfaction by Patricia Ryan, MS

Why do you work at an organization serving older adults? Is it because you have a passion for the discipline or the people? Need a paycheck? And, while you are thinking about that, do you like your job? ... To understand how workers perceive their jobs, ICAA added questions on job satisfaction to the recent ICAA Salary & Benefits Survey, sponsored by Precor. It is the first time this type of information on the wellness workforce has been captured on a national level, across different organizations. Some of the results may surprise you.

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Wellness staff members extend their sphere of influence by Patricia Ryan, MS-5582

Wellness staff members extend their sphere of influence by Patricia Ryan, MS

Senior managers responding to an ICAA survey in 2014 said that lifestyle and wellness offerings were an extremely or very important strategy for growing their business. Implementing those offerings is the responsibility of the wellness workforce. To better understand how job descriptions are being written, the International Council on Active Aging conducted Salary & Benefits Surveys in 2011 and 2015. Collecting the work responsibilities of these professionals is important to define their positions and add context to compensation levels. It is also informative to compare positions in 2011 and 2015 to examine if, and how, responsibilities are changing.

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Inside the buildings: Research highlights wellness opportunities by Patricia Ryan, MS-5407

Inside the buildings: Research highlights wellness opportunities by Patricia Ryan, MS

The buildings are in place, the grass is cut, and a person at the front door greets arrivals. The structures provide the settings, but what will an older adult find when she or he walks through the front door? ... To answer this question, the International Council on Active Aging (ICAA) gathered information from its members and associated network through two recent surveys.

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Research

Brain training: Views diverge in the scientific community-5263

Brain training: Views diverge in the scientific community

In October 2014, 69 leading neurologists and cognitive psychologists signaled a consensus from the scientific community on the brain training industry. The consensus statement was skeptical of claims made about "computer-based brain games" - particularly that they offer "consumers a scientifically grounded avenue to reduce or reverse cognitive decline" - and cited a lack of scientific evidence to support them. A group of more than 125 medical doctors and scientists responded in December with an open letter expressing "significant reservations" about the statement.

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Steven Blair: a renowned researcher inspires the active-aging industry-4475

Steven Blair: a renowned researcher inspires the active-aging industry

In 2012, when considering who to recognize with the second annual ICAA INSPIRE Award, CEO Colin Milner chose a researcher whose studies have had a tremendous impact, whose service as an ICAA Advisory Board Member has helped advance the industry, and whose support for the association predates its launch: Steven N. Blair, PED.

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Research

Higher-intensity interval training moves to the pool by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP-3572

Higher-intensity interval training moves to the pool by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP

Are your participants short on time? Recommend a quick, low-impact run in the pool to squeeze out the health benefits of higher-intensity interval training (HIIT). Interval training alternates bursts of high energy with low-energy recovery cycles. Research suggests this kind of approach offers a viable, shorter alternative to higher volume, continuous aerobic exercise. Depending on a person’s fitness level and objective, the intermittent work and recovery bouts in HIIT may last seconds to minutes. Pool training provides opportunities to gear up, or down, intensity on demand by capturing water’s natural resistance. And a simple walk, jog or run can be performed with vigor in cool liquid comfort.

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Research

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