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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Technology

 

Engaging with ElliQ by Marilynn Larkin, MA-6497

Engaging with ElliQ by Marilynn Larkin, MA

"Robots that engage with people are absolutely the future. There's no question that's where robotics is moving," states Brian Scassellatis, PhD, a professor of computer science, cognitive science and mechanical engineering and director of the Social Robotics Lab at Yale University. ... Among the offerings moving right along with this trend is the award-winning "ElliQ, the Active Aging Companion," developed by Intuition Robotics.

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Technology

Voyaging via virtual reality by Marilynn Larkin, MA-6317

Voyaging via virtual reality by Marilynn Larkin, MA

Excited by growing scientific evidence that virtual reality (VR) is a useful tool for cognitive and physical rehabilitation, I was eager to look at VR programs that are being marketed directly to the active-aging industry for use with residents. While none have yet undergone rigorous large-scale studies, one in particular has been piloted in multiple settings, and will soon be tested in a Harvard University-led study. Rendever, said to "give older adults a window to parts of the world that they're missing," is notable in that it was developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) students who won a USD$25,000 Healthcare Innovations prize for the program in 2017. Maplewood Senior Living, which owns and operates 14 senior living communities in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Ohio, is among the first to pilot Rendever. I recently talked with Maplewood's Brian Geyser, APRN-BC, MSN, vice president of Clinical Innovation and Population Health, about the program, why he decided to deploy it and what the outcomes are so far.

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Technology

HomeLab: A real-life testing ground for older-adult products and services by Marilynn Larkin, MA-6224

HomeLab: A real-life testing ground for older-adult products and services by Marilynn Larkin, MA

From home health care to government agencies to senior living, organizations are looking for effective ways to promote health, wellness, quality of life and safety for older adults where they live--whether in family homes in the community or in cottages and apartments on a senior living campus. Products, services and, increasingly, technologies are part of the answer. But to ensure that offerings meet the needs and goals of older adults and organizations today, plus shape future possibilities, the active-aging industry needs to assist those who design, manufacture and supply them. Many Journal on Active Aging readers express a desire to have their organizations participate in research, and so I'm focusing this column on the Georgia Institute of Technology's HomeLab. An initiative of Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), HomeLab brings together an interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers to do research with older adults. The program is exciting, and expanding, so there's an opportunity to get involved!

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Technology

Purchasing new technology: Overcoming vendor overload by Marilynn Larkin, MA-6008

Purchasing new technology: Overcoming vendor overload by Marilynn Larkin, MA

"Like most companies, we receive a constant flow of pitches from vendors who come to us with new technology solutions," Brookdale Senior Living's Andrew Smith, PMP, MEd, director of innovation and strategy, told me recently in an interview. "We love the idea that so many innovators are creating products with seniors in mind," he adds. "The truth is we often have to turn them away because the product is not at the right stage of development." I had reached out to Smith, who deals with this issue almost daily, because International Council on Active Aging CEO Colin Milner has said that many ICAA members struggle with making the right technology purchasing decisions for their organizations or communities--and that for some, fear of making the wrong decision often keeps them from making any decisions at all. Happily, Smith agreed to share the process he implemented with his team at Tennessee-based Brookdale to help readers who are grappling with similar concerns.

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Technology

What an

What an "ignited" older adult will look like in 2035 by Richard H. Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS

Mark Twain said that life would be better if we started at 80 and worked down to 18. George Burns said as he smoked his cigar, "If I had known I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself." He lived vigorously for 100 years. Being the comedian he was, when asked what he would like for his 90th birthday, he said, "A paternity suit"! Both Mark Twain and George Burns were "ignited" seniors in their time who lived twice their life expectancy and thrived through their last days. Based on their birthdates, they were anomalies not only for their longevity, but also due to their profound productivity through their entire long, ignited life spans. They indeed preserved and enhanced their brains' neural networks and cognitive ability. Today, the world is facing disruptive change without precedent. We will soon have more older people than children, and centenarians are becoming commonplace. Many questions arise from these seismic demographic shifts. Can we maintain or enhance health and cognitive ability as we age? How will society address these issues? What roles will technology and science play in supporting our seniors to stay ignited? ... Let's briefly look at the demographics and science of aging before addressing the concept of an ignited senior, how society must adjust, and the impact of technology and science on the ability of our older adults to "ignite."

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Technology

Overcoming fear of technology: 5 points to put you at ease by Marilynn Larkin, MA-5975

Overcoming fear of technology: 5 points to put you at ease by Marilynn Larkin, MA

If you're afraid of technology, you have plenty of company. A couple of years ago, The Atlantic magazine published an article entitled "Americans are more afraid of robots than death." The author reported on a national survey from Chapman University in Orange, California, that found that three tech-related fears--"cyberterrorism," "corporate tracking of personal information" and "government tracking of personal information"--were among Americans' top five fears in 2015. ..Christopher Bader, PhD, a sociology professor at Chapman and a coauthor of the fear survey, is quoted as saying, "People tend to express the highest level of fear for things they're dependent on but that they don't have any control over, and that's almost a perfect definition of technology."

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Technology

Total items: 14

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