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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Trends

 

What an

What an "ignited" older adult will look like in 2035 by Richard H. Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS

Mark Twain said that life would be better if we started at 80 and worked down to 18. George Burns said as he smoked his cigar, "If I had known I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself." He lived vigorously for 100 years. Being the comedian he was, when asked what he would like for his 90th birthday, he said, "A paternity suit"! Both Mark Twain and George Burns were "ignited" seniors in their time who lived twice their life expectancy and thrived through their last days. Based on their birthdates, they were anomalies not only for their longevity, but also due to their profound productivity through their entire long, ignited life spans. They indeed preserved and enhanced their brains' neural networks and cognitive ability. Today, the world is facing disruptive change without precedent. We will soon have more older people than children, and centenarians are becoming commonplace. Many questions arise from these seismic demographic shifts. Can we maintain or enhance health and cognitive ability as we age? How will society address these issues? What roles will technology and science play in supporting our seniors to stay ignited? ... Let's briefly look at the demographics and science of aging before addressing the concept of an ignited senior, how society must adjust, and the impact of technology and science on the ability of our older adults to "ignite."

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Perspectives: What's happening in technology for aging adults by Liz Seegert-5883

Perspectives: What's happening in technology for aging adults by Liz Seegert

It was only 10 years ago that the first Apple iPhone debuted and we could hold a computer in the palm of our hand. In less than a decade, we've developed amazing advances that allow us to experience virtual reality through a pair of glasses, smart chips that track our movements down to a few meters, and integrated health technology that allows a surgeon in California to assist in a complex procedure in Florida. Like the Boomers who helped invent many of these advances, technology is having a huge impact on the active-aging industry. However, some experts say the industry isn't keeping pace with nee

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Trends

The future is upon us: Canyon Ranch's Dr. Richard Carmona talks technology by Colin Milner with Jenifer Milner-5879

The future is upon us: Canyon Ranch's Dr. Richard Carmona talks technology by Colin Milner with Jenifer Milner

Author Thomas L. Friedman makes the case in Thank You for Being Late, his recent best-seller, that we are living in an "accelerated" world due to the faster pace of change in the "three largest forces on our planet," including technology--which is growing exponentially. "As a result [of these accelerations], so many aspects of our societies, workplaces and geopolitics are being reshaped and need to be reimagined," he writes. Technological advances offer active-aging proponents new possibilities to promote health and well-being for the 50+ adult and for organizations to implement their missions, goals and business strategies. Professionals in active aging take a deep interest in the types and quantities of technology available for purchase. In common with so many others, however, they also feel greatly confused at times.

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Trends

The value proposition: Embracing technology for client wellness and business success by Marilynn Larkin, MA-5873

The value proposition: Embracing technology for client wellness and business success by Marilynn Larkin, MA

The International Council on Active Aging is building on insights gathered during the technology-focused 2016 ICAA Forum, as well as the latest research, to keep members up to date on advances relevant to active-aging stakeholders. "Over the past few years, there's been a greater emphasis in society as a whole--and also within our membership--on utilizing technology to improve health and well-being, to streamline the operational side of an organization and to achieve greater success with the business model," says ICAA's founder and CEO, Colin Milner.

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Trends

The intergenerational imperative: Why we've never needed each other more by Lori K. Bitter, MS-5834

The intergenerational imperative: Why we've never needed each other more by Lori K. Bitter, MS

Intergenerational. It's the hot new buzzword in aging though it's been around for years. It's also steaming hot at a time when ageism is rampant and headlines report workplace warfare between Boomers and Millennials. To be sure, the unrest is real. Boomers lost jobs during the Great Recession and have struggled to earn again at the same rate. Millennials stayed in their parents' homes, not earning enough to launch into an independent adult life. Throw family caregiving for loved ones into the mix and a clear pattern of interdependency begins to be clear. How did we get here? The current picture starts with increases in longevity.

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The expectations gap: A new opportunity and a new challenge by Colin Milner-5793

The expectations gap: A new opportunity and a new challenge by Colin Milner

At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab, the prospect of "Life Tomorrow" engages a multidisciplinary research team. "The MIT AgeLab focuses not on aging"- as might be expected - "but on the future of living," according to a video overview. Director Joseph F. Coughlin, PhD, founded the research program “to invent new ideas and creatively translate technologies into practical solutions that improve people's health and enable them to 'do things' throughout the life span.” Of equal importance "is the belief that innovations in how products are designed, services are delivered, or policies are implemented are (critical) to our quality of life tomorrow."

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Trends

Total items: 41

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