0
What's new: The business case for wellness programs in senior living.

Articles

Search by topic

The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Health, wealth and longevity: New tools allow science-based financial planning by S. Jay Olshansky, PhD, Karl Ricanek, PhD, Kirk Ashburn, CCPS, and Steven Austad, PhD-7968

Health, wealth and longevity: New tools allow science-based financial planning by S. Jay Olshansky, PhD, Karl Ricanek, PhD, Kirk Ashburn, CCPS, and Steven Austad, PhD

The wealthiest individuals tend to lead longer lives than their poorest counterparts--up to an additional 15 years for men and 10 years for women in one 2016 study. The researchers noted at the time that these disparities could relate to differences in educational levels, lifestyles and health behaviors rather than simply financial status. Now, a newly published study in the Journal of Gerontology shows that when compared to the poorest individuals, the wealthiest men and women also enjoy nearly a decade longer in "favorable states of health" and free from disability, based on estimates arrived at by measuring healthy life expectancy (referred to here as healthspan). Even as calls go out to address disparities and improve healthy life expectancy for all, more people are already living to advanced ages. Many will outlive their money and large segments of the population have little or no money set aside for retirement at all, creating personal as well as public challenges across a wide range of areas, including housing and healthcare. What if it did not have to be that way? Financial advisors know that health and happiness are by far the most precious commodities that clients seek--longevity is just a bonus. Wealth amplifies the chances that both will occur. Longevity accompanied by good health then becomes a gift. Today, new tools merge aging science with wealth planning to help individuals achieve these goals.

more

Industry development

The flip side: Weighing benefits versus drawbacks of innovative technologies by Marilynn Larkin, MA-7964

The flip side: Weighing benefits versus drawbacks of innovative technologies by Marilynn Larkin, MA

Technology: The word can evoke both excitement and uncertainty among active-aging industry providers in all settings, from senior living and seniors centers to health clubs and rehabilitation centers. Excitement, because new technologies often provide opportunities to accomplish tasks faster and more easily and may enable staff and constituents to take charge of their health and connect socially; uncertainty, because implementing those same applications often requires a change in the status quo, a learning curve and, of course, a cost. How do you know if you're choosing the right product for your wellness services-or if you even need it? How do you best apply and monitor it? How do you ensure the most beneficial aspects of technologies are successfully implemented, and with a minimum of disruption or mistakes? And how do you retain the personal, social connections so critical to well-being, while also staying current and competitive? "Technology has become both a solution and a challenge," states International Council on Active Aging CEO Colin Milner. In this interview, he shares examples of how technology can help-but at times work against-dimensions of wellness and society at large.

more

Management

Beacons of excellence: Profiling winners in the wellness culture space by Julie Halpert-7960

Beacons of excellence: Profiling winners in the wellness culture space by Julie Halpert

After 15 years living in a rural community on the Chesapeake Bay, Joel Grow, 69, and his wife, Rebecca, 73, decided to move to a senior living community. The Grows don't have children. They feared that getting care as they aged would be challenging in their remote setting on America's Mid-Atlantic coast. An acquaintance suggested they visit Sunnyside Retirement Community, a life-plan community located in Harrisonburg, Virginia. In March 2018, the couple moved to Sunnyside. "I haven't lived in any other retirement community, but I know this is a wonderful place," Joel states. In fact, Sunnyside is more than a nice place to live. Along with state and international awards, the Virginia community is one of the top five [of 25] winners of the inaugural ICAA NuStep Beacon Award, announced October 2019. To win the Beacon award, communities must demonstrate the ways in which they meet the seven dimensions of wellness: emotional, physical, intellectual, social, spiritual, vocational and environmental. Previously, the Journal on Active Aging featured an article on Moorings Park, the number one "Best in Wellness" community... The four communities that round out the top five are profiled in the article in this issue.

more

Business profiles

Strengthen the immune system naturally: More lifestyle strategies to counter chronic inflammation by Shirley Archer, JD, MA-7955

Strengthen the immune system naturally: More lifestyle strategies to counter chronic inflammation by Shirley Archer, JD, MA

If someone suggested that making very simple adjustments to one's daily routine would result in more energy, better sleep and potentially fewer aches and pains, with no adverse side effects and yet a host of beneficial side effects, would that persuade you or the people you work with to adopt them? In part one of my Journal on Active Aging (JAA) article on countering chronic inflammation for healthier aging, I described how lifestyle choices, environmental factors and genetics affect conditions related to inflammation. Since our genetics and many environmental factors--such as exposure to pollutants or environmental contaminants--are beyond our control, what we can influence are our lifestyle choices. The first article provided an overview of inflammation and focused on nutritional strategies to lower inflammation. Growing evidence is shining light on additional lifestyle factors and their relationship with the immune system. This second article offers a sampling of areas in which older adults can make simple lifestyle changes to support a healthy immune system, improve quality of life and enhance healthy aging.

more

Gerontology

Targeting elder abuse by Alice Steinfeld, MEd, MA, LPC-7619

Targeting elder abuse by Alice Steinfeld, MEd, MA, LPC

With the age 60+ population predicted to nearly double worldwide by 2050, the potential for mistreatment of older adults will increase exponentially along with their need for care and support. That's because individuals may become a target of abuse and exploitation as they grow more dependent due to frayed community connections, inadequate social support for families, and ageism that sees older people as less than equal. Whether care comes from family members, professionals or self-care, laws are needed to protect older adults from possible abuse or neglect and ensure they are treated fairly. Often, elder abuse goes unreported because the individual depends greatly on the abuser, or a lack of clarity exists concerning what constitutes such abuse. In fact, elder abuse is a serious and growing challenge. Like other types of domestic violence, elder abuse is complicated. Contributors include a mixture of psychological, social and economic factors, along with the mental and physical conditions of both survivor and abuser. As professionals dedicated to quality of life for older adults, we all have a responsibility to participate in attempts to stop elder abuse, despite the inherent difficulties. So, how do we prevent or end something so complex?

more

Gerontology

Prevent, treat, survive: Eating well through the continuum of cancer by Lori S. Kiker, MS, RDN, LD, CSO-7617

Prevent, treat, survive: Eating well through the continuum of cancer by Lori S. Kiker, MS, RDN, LD, CSO

Research reflects progress in the fight against cancer over the past decades. In the United States, overall age-adjusted death rates declined 27% between 1991 and 2016, largely due to fewer people smoking and improved early detection and treatment, says a recent American Cancer Society report. Most new cancer diagnoses occur in adults 50 and over; specifically, 80% of new diagnoses in the US and about 90% in Canada are in the 50+ age group. As a result, cancer cases will continue to rise in line with a growing older population. By staying physically active and maintaining good nutrition, adults diagnosed with cancer in later life may better tolerate cancer treatments and get the most from their therapies. Individuals often have questions about nutrition throughout the disease journey and may come to you-as an active-aging professional-for help. This article provides the answers to many common questions people have asked me as a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist specializing in oncology. It also tackles some widespread myths about nutrition and cancer.

more

Health conditions

Total items: 1143

icaa 100 members