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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Older women traveling solo by Gwen Hyatt, MS-7440

Older women traveling solo by Gwen Hyatt, MS

Curiosity, wanderlust, personal growth, retirement, an empty nest, lack of a travel partner: Older women travel alone for many reasons. Today, with more opportunities to make the most of this longer “third age,” more women are adventuring into the world of solo travel. No longer willing to stay marginalized by stereotypes, these women are helping shape the contours of a more mobile aging lifestyle....Solo trips now offer everything from women-only ski camps in the Alps, walking holidays in Scotland, cultural trips in India and yoga retreats in Costa Rica, to painting workshops in Greece and cooking weeks Italian style....The possibilities for program planning are increasing exponentially for fitness instructors, wellness and activity program directors, senior living tour operators, travel divisions in seniors centers, concierge/resident services, travel clubs and sales and marketing personnel.

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Trends

Countering chronic inflammation for healthier aging, part one: The food connection by Shirley Archer, JD, MA-7438

Countering chronic inflammation for healthier aging, part one: The food connection by Shirley Archer, JD, MA

Do you wake up feeling fatigued? Do you suffer from joint pain or stiffness? Digestive problems? If you have one or more of these symptoms, you may be dealing with chronic or long-term inflammation....The good news: Scientists have become better not only at identifying chronic inflammation’s presence, but also in how to reduce it for better well-being. As an individual who’s aging—namely, all of us—and as an active-aging professional, it’s valuable to understand this “top of mind” topic to educate others and to implement programs that can reduce excess inflammation and promote health.

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Research

Combating ageism: A groundbreaking study examines interventions to bridge generations by Marilynn Larkin, MA-7435

Combating ageism: A groundbreaking study examines interventions to bridge generations by Marilynn Larkin, MA

"Ageism, defined as stereotyping, prejudice or discrimination toward people on the basis of age, is a mounting international concern with important health implications," write Cornell University’s Karl Pillemer, PhD, and colleagues in a seminal new study. The first-of-its-kind study aggregated interventions to reduce ageist attitudes, prejudices and stereotypes around the world. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, the researchers looked at the effects of intergenerational programming on ageism. Their findings have implications for active-aging professionals who seek to overturn ways of thinking and practices that, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), are “insidious” and "everywhere" yet "the most socially ‘normalized’ of any prejudice and…not widely countered."

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Research

Simple environmental design solutions to support sleep for healthy aging by Regina Vaicekonyte, MS, WELL AP; Carolyn Swope, MPH, WELL AP; Stephanie Timm, PhD, LEED AP, WELL AP; and Whitney Austin Gray-7433

Simple environmental design solutions to support sleep for healthy aging by Regina Vaicekonyte, MS, WELL AP; Carolyn Swope, MPH, WELL AP; Stephanie Timm, PhD, LEED AP, WELL AP; and Whitney Austin Gray

It is commonly believed that poor sleep is part of the normal aging process. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be, as many healthy older adults have few to no issues sleeping. However, about 70% of aging adults do experience sleep disturbances. New research is revealing how sleep can be impacted by our built environment—such as noise, temperature or light pollution—and offers new opportunities for sleep promotion. Although people are often encouraged to simply change their behavior, that’s easier said than done. Alternatives such as sleeping pills and alcohol are used as seemingly “quick fixes.” Instead, changing our built environment to support sleep makes the healthy choice the easy choice—and can benefit a community’s bottom line, too.

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Management

A new master plan for senior living by Sally Abrahms-7428

A new master plan for senior living by Sally Abrahms

Senior living is changing. While traditional stand-alone, age-segregated senior living communities will soon have fewer and fewer takers, forward-thinking communities are bringing the inside out and the outside in. What does that mean? Residents are increasingly becoming part of the larger community, whether it is interacting with neighbors of any age or people from around their town or city. And enterprising developers are repositioning their senior living communities as fun destinations to visit with great amenities that appeal to everyone. There are already master planned communities with care and retail, restaurants, stores, office and medical buildings, schools, wellness spas, hotels and homes. They may have a variety of housing...and people at different life stages in the same neighborhood.

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Industry development

Exergaming curbs frailty in individuals with dementia-7422

Exergaming curbs frailty in individuals with dementia

Many readers are familiar with Microsoft's exergame, which has been around for a number of years and is used by organizations both to motivate residents to get active and in friendly competitions among groups around the country and the world.

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Functional training

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