0
What's new: Creating your blueprint for a wellness-based community.

Articles

Search by topic

The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Function: A multidimensional view by Nicola Finley, MD-8210

Function: A multidimensional view by Nicola Finley, MD

What is function and how does it apply to healthy aging? We can view function in a multidimensional way similar to how we view wellness and the process of aging. The World Health Organization (WHO) describes function as the new criteria in a framework for healthy aging. The framework encompasses not only cognitive but also physical and social function, as well as how these factors are interrelated. One significant aspect of this healthy aging model is shifting away from the presence or absence of disease. Rather, this view focuses on a person's function and what the person values. This approach results in a more personalized view of healthy aging since aging is not homogenous--the process of aging will look different from one person to another. ... Professionals in the active-aging industry know that function is important to independence and quality of life for older adults. What do different dimensions of function encompass, however, and what does a multidimensional view mean? Let's explore these dimensions

more

Gerontology

Aging in the time of COVID-19, part two: An ICAA interview with Age Wave's Ken Dychtwald by Colin Milner-8205

Aging in the time of COVID-19, part two: An ICAA interview with Age Wave's Ken Dychtwald by Colin Milner

In the 1980s, psychologist and gerontologist Ken Dychtwald, PhD, predicted a "demographic revolution" in the making. Demographic and cultural forces would converge, he believed, in an "absolutely predictable arrival, in our society and in our time," of an unprecedented demographic shift to an aging population. For this phenomenon, he coined the term age wave. And he signaled the need for society to prepare in his 1989 book Age Wave: The Challenges and Opportunities of an Aging America. Today, the renowned researcher, consultant and best-selling author of 17 books is considered one of North America's most original thinkers on the social, economic, healthcare, marketing and workforce implications of the age wave. As CEO of the International Council on Active Aging, I have long viewed Dr. Dychtwald as an early visionary whose work helped to lay the foundation for the active-aging industry and continues to this day to build it. Below is part two of an interview I conducted with Dychtwald earlier this year, in which he delves into topics ranging from challenges with healthcare, wellness and Alzheimer's, to COVID's senior living impact, to longevity, retirement and the "third age." He also ponders the question of legacy. Let's jump in.

more

Industry development

Brain-health literacy: A strategy to inspire brain-healthy lifestyles by Jeffrey Rossman, PhD, and Cornelia Lenherr, MD-8199

Brain-health literacy: A strategy to inspire brain-healthy lifestyles by Jeffrey Rossman, PhD, and Cornelia Lenherr, MD

As our population ages, the incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia steadily increases. MCI, characterized by minor but measurable declines in cognitive abilities, increases a person's risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other forms of dementia. Progressing to a dementia diagnosis is not inevitable, however. ... It is now generally acknowledged that the roots of neurodegeneration--that is, deterioration in the brain's nerve function and structure--begin at least 20-30 years before dementia symptoms are noticeable. By the time a diagnosis is made, reversal of the disease process in Alzheimer's and other dementias is currently considered unattainable. While no cure exists for these conditions, intervention can reduce symptoms. Further, for those with mild or subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), intervention may profoundly affect the progression of brain degeneration and symptoms of cognitive impairment. ... Recent research has explored the influence on brain health of modifying specific lifestyle factors and reducing cardiovascular disease risks. ... Through a brain-healthy literacy model, participants learn which lifestyle practices support brain health, why they exert a beneficial impact, and how to enjoyably and sustainably engage in those practices.

more

Cardiovascular health

Crusading against ageism in America's presidential elections by Beth Witrogen, BA, MJ-8194

Crusading against ageism in America's presidential elections by Beth Witrogen, BA, MJ

Dr. S. Jay Olshansky is on a mission: He wants to eviscerate ageism in the US presidential elections. A professor of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Olshansky specializes in the upper limits to human longevity and biodemography, a scientific field he created with Dr. Bruce Carnes in 1992. He is unabashedly vocal about the way age has been "weaponized" in this election cycle. And, he urges, it must stop, "because science shows conclusively that chronological age is not relevant for either candidate...." As corresponding author of "Projected lifespan and healthspan of Joe Biden and Donald Trump before the 2020 election" (a special feature to the Journal on Active Aging available online), Olshansky directed a team of scientists and physicians to determine if Biden and Trump could survive the next four-year term. The team used independent biodemographic assessments of the two candidates' personal attributes--inherited and acquired risk factors for health and longevity--and public medical data that was evaluated independently by three physicians with expertise in human aging. The Journal on Active Aging spoke with Dr. Olshansky about his new research, why both candidates may be "super agers" and his message for those who would politicize aging.

more

Culture Change

Delaying Parkinson's with regular exercise by Jackie Russell, RN, BSN, CNOR-8187

Delaying Parkinson's with regular exercise by Jackie Russell, RN, BSN, CNOR

Probably the best-known person living today with Parkinson's disease is actor, advocate and author Michael J. Fox. Diagnosed with early-onset Parkinson's at age 29 in 1991, he retired from acting in 2000, the same year he launched The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research. While the foundation has transformed the Parkinson's landscape over the past two decades, Fox has inspired people with his return to acting, his activism and his best-selling books. In his new publication, No Time Like the Future: An Optimist Considers Mortality, the 59-year-old announces plans to retire again from acting due this time to declining health. But he also writes about the years after his first retirement, during which he worked with a movement disorder specialist who focused on nutrition, physical therapy and fitness. That time, he says, was "restorative, less stressful," enabling him "to get a better grip on the disease." Diagnosed typically in older people, Parkinson's is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, a disorder characterized by "loss of neurons [nerve cells] in the central nervous system, which leads to deficits in specific brain functions.".... What causes Parkinson"s remains largely unknown. There is no cure. Symptomatic treatment options include medications, surgical therapy, lifestyle modifications and physical activity.

more

Exercise

Preventing falls: Interventions to reduce fall risk by Mike Siemens, MS-8179

Preventing falls: Interventions to reduce fall risk by Mike Siemens, MS

In our youth, we walk, run, jump and skip effortlessly. Navigating stairs, obstacles and slippery surfaces are a welcome challenge. Our brain, nervous system and muscles work in remarkable harmony to guide us safely through almost any terrain we choose to conquer. As we age, a constellation of factors conspire to challenge our balance and coordination. Simply put, if we want to remain confident on our feet and do our best to avoid falls, training, practice and attention to factors that impact balance are necessary after age 50. ... [A] great deal of research has been done in the area of fall prevention and many effective strategies identified...that are proven to be effective in reducing falls by up to 67%. As health, wellness and active-aging communities, it is imperative to communicate these strategies to the general public, so we can reduce the significant impact falls have on quality of life. Let’s take a closer look at these strategies.

more

Falls management

Total items: 1162

icaa 100 members