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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Research

 

Inside the buildings: Research highlights wellness opportunities by Patricia Ryan, MS-5407

Inside the buildings: Research highlights wellness opportunities by Patricia Ryan, MS

The buildings are in place, the grass is cut, and a person at the front door greets arrivals. The structures provide the settings, but what will an older adult find when she or he walks through the front door? ... To answer this question, the International Council on Active Aging (ICAA) gathered information from its members and associated network through two recent surveys.

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Research

Brain training: Views diverge in the scientific community-5263

Brain training: Views diverge in the scientific community

In October 2014, 69 leading neurologists and cognitive psychologists signaled a consensus from the scientific community on the brain training industry. The consensus statement was skeptical of claims made about "computer-based brain games" - particularly that they offer "consumers a scientifically grounded avenue to reduce or reverse cognitive decline" - and cited a lack of scientific evidence to support them. A group of more than 125 medical doctors and scientists responded in December with an open letter expressing "significant reservations" about the statement.

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Research

Steven Blair: a renowned researcher inspires the active-aging industry-4475

Steven Blair: a renowned researcher inspires the active-aging industry

In 2012, when considering who to recognize with the second annual ICAA INSPIRE Award, CEO Colin Milner chose a researcher whose studies have had a tremendous impact, whose service as an ICAA Advisory Board Member has helped advance the industry, and whose support for the association predates its launch: Steven N. Blair, PED.

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Research

Higher-intensity interval training moves to the pool by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP-3572

Higher-intensity interval training moves to the pool by Mary E. Sanders, PhD, FACSM, RCEP

Are your participants short on time? Recommend a quick, low-impact run in the pool to squeeze out the health benefits of higher-intensity interval training (HIIT). Interval training alternates bursts of high energy with low-energy recovery cycles. Research suggests this kind of approach offers a viable, shorter alternative to higher volume, continuous aerobic exercise. Depending on a person’s fitness level and objective, the intermittent work and recovery bouts in HIIT may last seconds to minutes. Pool training provides opportunities to gear up, or down, intensity on demand by capturing water’s natural resistance. And a simple walk, jog or run can be performed with vigor in cool liquid comfort.

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Research

Access to nature boosts physical activity among older adults, saves staff time by Susan Rodiek, Ph.D., NCARB-1834

Access to nature boosts physical activity among older adults, saves staff time by Susan Rodiek, Ph.D., NCARB

On September 13, 2010, my colleagues and I were gratified to receive a professional award from the American Society of Landscape Architects at the society’s annual meeting in Washington, DC. That award, and the recognition our team has received from numerous organizations that provide long-term care to older adults, reinforced the value of the time and effort we put into developing an instrument that makes environmental evaluations of assisted living communities more quantifiable and reliable, and enables providers to compare satisfaction-related outcomes associated with physical environments.

We developed the instrument based on seven key principles that evaluate specific environmental qualities in assisted living communities (For more information, see Principles for outdoor areas that encourage resident participation on page XX). We then identified up to 10 ratable items that appeared to be the main components of each principle, resulting in a total of 63 individual items, which we used in the evaluation tool. After evaluating 68 randomly selected communities in various parts of the United States, and surveying 1,560 residents and staff, we identified a number of landscape features that were strongly associated with outdoor usage.

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Research

Gray, green, and active: Environmental volunteerism benefits older adults and society by Karl Pillemer, Ph.D.-1819

Gray, green, and active: Environmental volunteerism benefits older adults and society by Karl Pillemer, Ph.D.

Martin Phillips volunteers many hours each month in local environmental organizations, helping to organize trail clean-ups and testing water quality in streams. His goal is to help preserve the earth for future generations, even though he will not personally see the benefits. Maria Groves volunteers as a receptionist for a nature center, noting that she enjoys the children who participate in the programs and socializing with staff and other volunteers. Janice Phelps has always loved being outside in nature; her political work on environmental issues comes from a deep attachment to the natural world, which she feels is sacred and must be preserved. John Trent is politically conservative and will tell you right away: “I’m no tree-hugger!” But he has spent a lifetime hunting and fishing and is concerned about the destruction of natural areas that used to teem with wildlife, so he volunteers to protect them.

These individuals pursue different activities and have divergent motivations. But they have one thing in common: They are part of a growing movement of people in their 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond who have become environmental volunteers, working to create a sustainable society and to conserve our natural resources. Not only do these “gray and green” volunteers help solve one of the major challenges of our time, but research shows environmental volunteering also leads to improved health and well-being of older persons. Now researchers, policy makers, and non-profit organizations are seeking ways to encourage environmental volunteering and civic engagement (EVCE) among individuals after retirement.

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Research

Total items: 38

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