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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Social marketing

 

Promote exercise to people with arthritis-1276

Promote exercise to people with arthritis

When joints are stiff and in pain, physical activity seems like that last thing a person wants to do. On top of the discomfort, concerned friends and relations may urge a person with arthritis to “sit and rest.” Sedentary living, common in older adults, is certainly common in older adults with arthritis (1, 2).

There are many forms of arthritis, a chronic condition that affects the musculoskeletal system and joints (and sometimes the organs). Osteoarthritis is the most common form among all ages and particularly among older adults (3, 4). Osteoarthritis occurs because the cartilage that cushions the two bones meeting in a joint breaks down. Over time, the cartilage wears down and the bones begin to rub together. The result is changes to the joint, including swelling, bony protuberances and weakness in the joints and tendons (5, 6).

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Social marketing

Best practices in promoting physical activity by Patricia Ryan, MS-1111

Best practices in promoting physical activity by Patricia Ryan, MS

When it comes to quality of life, it’s hard to imagine anything more powerful, accessible and inexpensive than physical activity. Important throughout the lifespan, older adults particularly benefit from physical movement.

Functional independence, falls prevention, bone health, cardiovascular health and prevention or management of chronic disease leap to mind as benefits. There are psychological advantages, too, such as feeling better, and an association with cognitive performance (1, 2, 8).

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Social marketing

Advertise vegetables and fruits  by Patricia Ryan, MS-1082

Advertise vegetables and fruits by Patricia Ryan, MS

Physical activity and nutrition are intertwined within the physical dimension of wellness. Both healthy food and activity are needed for overall health and the prevention or management of heart disease, diabetes, obesity and other conditions that are more common in older ages.

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Social marketing

Develop your marketing plan for Active Aging Week by Patricia Ryan, MS-544

Develop your marketing plan for Active Aging Week by Patricia Ryan, MS

Why would an older person want to attend an Active Aging Week event? And why your event? Now that you’ve started planning activities for the week, it’s time to sit back and think about how you will let people know about them.

Since the goal of any special event that promotes a healthy lifestyle—walk, class or presentation—is to encourage people to try the activity, your marketing plan is an important step. If people do not attend, they can’t try the activity!

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Social marketing

Promoting physical activity in ethnic communities: perspectives from older adults by Julie Walwick, MSW, Sharyne Shiu-Thornton, PhD, Basia Belza, PhD, RN, Sheryl Schwartz, MPA, and James P. LoGerfo, M-389

Promoting physical activity in ethnic communities: perspectives from older adults by Julie Walwick, MSW, Sharyne Shiu-Thornton, PhD, Basia Belza, PhD, RN, Sheryl Schwartz, MPA, and James P. LoGerfo, M

Increased physical activity is a key strategy for preventing and managing chronic diseases among older adults. However, most adults—particularly older adults—do not get the recommended 30 minutes of moderate activity on most days of the week. Elders from ethnic minority communities are even less likely to meet this goal.

Yet many ethnic minority groups in the United States have a high prevalence of chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. Individuals in these communities are also more likely than Caucasians to die from these conditions. Additionally, numerous non-English-speaking immigrants feel isolated, and they are often misinformed about their health status as they lack healthcare providers from their cultural backgrounds. Given these realities, physical activity programs offer obvious benefits for older adults in ethnic minority communities, but programs for these men and women are rare.

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Social marketing

The obesity message: marketing physical activity to large older adults by Jenifer Milner-333

The obesity message: marketing physical activity to large older adults by Jenifer Milner

Along with genetic and environmental factors, personal behavior influences obesity. Two health-promoting behaviors widely known to help people manage their weight include eating a nutritious diet and being physically active. Yet “[t]here is no evidence that older Americans are, as a group, making much progress in improving their diets or controlling their weight,” notes a 2002 AARP research report. “Less than one-third [of individuals ages 50 and older] are eating the recommended portions of fruits and vegetables, less than half are exercising or trying to increase their level of physical activity, and less than 20 percent are trying to lose weight by combining diet with increased physical activity.”

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Social marketing

Total items: 10

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