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What's new: The business case for wellness programs in senior living.

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The Journal on Active Aging brings articles of value to professionals dedicated to older-adult quality of life. Content sweeps across the active-aging landscape to focus on education and practice. Find articles of interest by searching the article archives in three ways: Enter a keyword in the articles search bar; click on search by topic; or type a keyword or phrase in the general search bar at the top of the page.

Topic- Management

 

Leading with lifestyle for marketing and sales success by Kimberly Hulett, BA, and Erin Read, BA-5639

Leading with lifestyle for marketing and sales success by Kimberly Hulett, BA, and Erin Read, BA

"The Boomers are coming! The Boomers are coming!" For a decade, this has been a common theme of conference presentations, media headlines and board meetings. Many of those offering housing and services to actively aging adults have felt stumped by this "new" consumer--the 50- or 60-something Baby Boomer. The reality is that with the rising age of entry for residents in continuing care retirement communities and other senior living settings, the "new" consumer is just as likely to be a 70-something member of the Silent Generation. There is one marketing technique that works with active adults of both cohorts. Lifestyle.

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Management

Making the connection between wellness and quality of life by Patricia Ryan, MS-5517

Making the connection between wellness and quality of life by Patricia Ryan, MS

When asked about what’s important as they age, older adults often place “health” and “being independent” at the top of the list, whether the question is asked by financial companies, AARP or university researchers. According to the International Council on Active Aging’s industry research, the health and well-being of residents is the top reason why age-qualified communities invest in lifestyle/wellness programs. So it’s fair to ask: How successful are communities in supporting their residents’ health, independence and overall quality of life?

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Management

Improving the dining experience for older adults by Marilynn Larkin, MA-5504

Improving the dining experience for older adults by Marilynn Larkin, MA

When it comes to dining, change is not only "in the air"—it's very much happening on the ground in older-adult communities, according to recent research. A 2015 report, "The Senior Living Dining Evolution," by Senior Housing News states that dining "… has become a major differentiator for operators both in marketing to prospective residents and their family members, and in providing a strong quality of life for those at all stages of care." The Journal on Active Aging recently spoke to representatives from several organizations that have been transforming their residents’ dining options and experiences in recent years.

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Management

Does a wellness program make life better for residents in age-qualified communities? by Patricia Ryan, MS-5497

Does a wellness program make life better for residents in age-qualified communities? by Patricia Ryan, MS

Do wellness programs bring value to a community? Are they worth the investment? When it comes to wellness programs, the contribution to residents in senior living—and the community’s budget—is not always clear. However, when the fundamental purpose of an age-qualified community is the health and well-being of older adults, then lifestyle opportunities and wellness services become a critical factor in attracting and retaining residents, which in turn influences the financial objectives that make delivering on the mission possible. ... New data demonstrates it is possible to measure the value a wellness program brings to the residents, and to the community’s operational objectives.

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Management

How to tell if job candidates have what it takes - especially

How to tell if job candidates have what it takes - especially "soft skills" - to work with older adults by Marilynn Larkin, MA

The evolution of the wellness profession extends to the skills organizations are looking for in new hires. Loosely defined by our interviewees as "people skills" or "communication skills," soft skills must go beyond the ability to relate well to older adults. Today, these skills need to extend to working with colleagues and senior management - and they apply to people who apply for "wellness" positions and, in organizations that embrace a wellness culture, to any candidate, regardless of title or level.

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Management

How Landis Communities fosters a consumer-centric culture-4990

How Landis Communities fosters a consumer-centric culture

"Consumer-friendly" is a critical differentiator with older adults as they look at organizations and the products and services they provide. So, how do you foster a consumer-centric culture that delivers customer-friendly service and information that stand out from the crowd? According to Landis Communities' Larry Guengerich, director of communications and church relations, it’s done carefully, with thoughtfulness and intention.

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Management

Total items: 57

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