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Access and utilize the ICAA library of scientific studies, reports and statistics to assist you with the development of your business case for wellness, program and community design and development, evidence-informed lifestyle choices and marketing strategies and approaches.

Tech Talk: Women's health apps don't meet basic privacy, security standards-9130

Tech Talk: Women's health apps don't meet basic privacy, security standards

"Many of the most popular women's mHealth apps on the market have poor data privacy, sharing, and security standards," authors of a recent study say. Since many of these apps are freely available online, active aging leaders need to be aware of this problem and consider educating residents and members about these issues, what to look for before installing a health app, and how to minimize use of their private data. It's likely that findings might be similar for men's health apps, among others.

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Health apps

Moderate exercise curbs kidney function decline in sedentary older adults-9124

Moderate exercise curbs kidney function decline in sedentary older adults

A structured moderate-intensity physical activity and strength/flexibility program slowed kidney function decline compared with health education, an analysis of a randomized clinical trial showed. The authors conclude that clinicians should consider prescribing physical activity and moderate-intensity exercise for older adults for this purpose. The study involved sedentary older adults, so has implications across the active aging continuum.

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Exercise

Novel advance care planning approach favored in Canada-9121

Novel advance care planning approach favored in Canada

Researchers have developed a more effective way to support end-of-life planning in long-term care facilities in Canada. The study approach involves the individual whose care is being planned for each step of the way. The researchers had found that only 40% of facilities were routinely involving residents in end-of-life care discussions. The findings have implications for assisted living and dementia care, as well.

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Advance care planning

New metric puts health above chronology in calculating aging burden-9115

New metric puts health above chronology in calculating aging burden

A new metric reveals health is more important than age for determining a country's dependency ratio. This is important on a global scale for making policy decisions and comparisons, and reinforces the more personalized concept of "health span," which is not dependent on chronological age.

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HADR

Poor eyesight unfairly mistaken for brain decline-9111

Poor eyesight unfairly mistaken for brain decline

Millions of older people with poor vision are at risk of being misdiagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, according to a study from the University of South Australia. Cognitive tests that rely on vision-dependent tasks could be skewing results in up to a quarter of people over age 50 who have undiagnosed visual problems such as cataracts or age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It's something to be aware of if members and residents seem to be losing cognition. They may be reluctant to acknowledge vision problems.

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Vision

Stats: Biological age of brisk walkers up to 16 years younger-9108

Stats: Biological age of brisk walkers up to 16 years younger

A study of genetic data from more than 400,000 UK adults revealed a clear link between walking pace and a genetic marker of biological age. Confirming a causal link between walking pace and leucocyte telomere length (LTL) -- an indicator of biological age -- the Leicester-based researchers estimate that a lifetime of brisk walking could lead to the equivalent of 16 years younger biological age by midlife. It's another strong reason to encourage brisker walking, when feasible, particularly in independent living settings.

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Walking

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